David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants

David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants➩ [Ebook] ➤ David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants By Malcolm Gladwell ➵ – Jobs-in-kingston.co.uk In his bestselling books The Tipping Point, Blink, and Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell has explored the ways we understand and change our world Now he looks at the complex and surprising ways the weak can In hisbestselling books The Tipping Point, Blink, Goliath: Underdogs, PDF/EPUB Á and Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell has explored the ways we understand and change our world Now he looks at the complex and surprising ways the weak can defeat the strong, the small can match up against the giant, and how David and eBook Î our goals often culturally determined can make a huge difference in our ultimate sense of success Drawing upon examples from the world of business, sports, culture, cutting edge psychology, and an array of unforgettable characters around the world, David and Goliath is in many ways the most and Goliath: Underdogs, eBook ´ practical and provocative book Malcolm Gladwell has ever written. Gladwell is taking a lot of heat for biasing the examples he chooses in his books to make points that are often later shown to be somewhat tenuous That may be the case, but he is a heck of a writer He knows how to tell a compelling story and the conversations he sparks go on for years Whatever harm that may come from the lack of rigorousness in his brand of pop psychology is easily overshadowed by the positive cultural impact that comes from people giving serious consideration to his ideas an Gladwell is taking a lot of heat for biasing the examples he chooses in his books to make points that are often later shown to be somewhat tenuous That may be the case, but he is a heck of a writer He knows how to tell a compelling story and the conversations he sparks go on for years Whatever harm that may come from the lack of rigorousness in his brand of pop psychology is easily overshadowed by the positive cultural impact that comes from people giving serious consideration to his ideas and how they apply to their personal lives and to society on a larger scale As with any book, don t read it passively, decide what you buy and what needs to be further examined Enjoy it, it s a fun read Update I came across a cool and relevant quote in The Tell Tale Brain by V S Ramachandran from Darwin s The Descent of Man false facts are highly injurious to the progress of science, for they often endure long but false views, if supported by some evidence, do little harm, for everyone takes a salutary pleasure in proving their falseness and when this is done, one path toward errors is closed and the road to truth is often at the same time opened I think everyone heard my jaw drop Much like a born again who reads the bible for the first time, I have never been able to relate to a book as well as with David Goliath.Disclosure I m a dyslexic who spent all of his youth struggling through school spending my lunches tirelessly improving my spelling while everyone else spent their lunch break improving their rest Things turned out all right, I was one of the first dyslexics at my school to graduate with an International Baccalaureate d I think everyone heard my jaw drop Much like a born again who reads the bible for the first time, I have never been able to relate to a book as well as with David Goliath.Disclosure I m a dyslexic who spent all of his youth struggling through school spending my lunches tirelessly improving my spelling while everyone else spent their lunch break improving their rest Things turned out all right, I was one of the first dyslexics at my school to graduate with an International Baccalaureate diploma and to receive the award for Extended Essay the longest and most time consuming piece an 18 year old writes And then recently I wrote a piece on my blog about criminal systems in Europe and America It was a personal project which led me through months of research and reflection I titled it, To punish is to promote How criminal justice systems can encourage crime and came to the conclusion that in some instances punishment may actually have the opposite effect intended In other words, I realized the limits of power So then to read Gladwell s David Goliath wasthan just an experience I could understand but completely relate with It was so empowering to know I wasn t alone, that there were manyremote misses fighting to be just as good as everyone else in school and ending up with skills no class can teach If you haven t read David Goliath you won t really understand what I m speaking about But I d encourage everyone to read it It will make you realize that there s no such thing as simple, black and white There s grey There s yellow, blue, pink, orange, you name it It will allow you to understand that for every difficult hardships life will throw at you you ll learn skills everyone else will wish they had So go on, read and be inspired to turn every disadvantage in your life into your strongest asset The Art of Avoiding Bestsellers A Field Guide for Authors How do books succeed By getting into the Bestseller lists By making a few millions By winning the most prestigious awards of the day Wrong.These are very narrow views on what constitutes success for a work of art, especially literature or serious non fiction If we redefine success, we might find that these very things that confers success in the short term might be hurting the artist author the most in the long term This applies The Art of Avoiding Bestsellers A Field Guide for Authors How do books succeed By getting into the Bestseller lists By making a few millions By winning the most prestigious awards of the day Wrong.These are very narrow views on what constitutes success for a work of art, especially literature or serious non fiction If we redefine success, we might find that these very things that confers success in the short term might be hurting the artist author the most in the long term This applies to prestigious prizes such as Bookers as well, as we will see We might even get an idea of why so few of the Booker winning books seem to be good enough a few years after their moment of glory Spoiler view spoiler They cater to the jury and the prevailing standards of judgement, which may become old too soon hide spoiler Let us illustrate this by taking an example from this very book This reviewer has to warn the reader that the example is originally invoked in the book for another purpose though it has been adoptedor less verbatim here, but we need to get into that now By the way, the careful reader should also be able to divine why this small essay is can also serve as a review for this book in particular and to all of Mr Gladwell s books in general Let us go back to 19th century France Art was a big deal in the cultural life of France back then Painting was regulated by the government and was considered a profession in the same way that medicine or the law is a profession today The Professionals who did well would win awards and prestigious fellowships And at the pinnacle of the profession was The Salon, the most important art exhibition in all of Europe Every year each of the painters of France submitted two or three of his finest canvases to a jury of experts, bringing their work to thePalais de l Industrie , an exhibition hall built for the Paris World Fair between the Champs lys es and the Seine Throughout the next few weeks, the jury would vote on each painting in turn Those deemed unacceptable would be stamped with the red letter R for rejected Those accepted would be hung on the walls of the Palais, and over the course of six weeks beginning in early May, as many as a million people would throng the exhibition The best paintings were given medals The winners were celebrated and saw the value of their paintings soar became bestsellers The losers limped home and went back to work There are in Paris scarcely fifteen art lovers capable of liking a painting without Salon approval, Renoir once said There are 80,000 who won t buy so much as a nose from a painter who is not hung at the Salon. The Salon was the most important art show in the world In short, for a painter in nineteenth century France, the Salon was everything the Booker Committee and the Bestseller List rolled into one And now, the twist In spite of the all the benefits, the acceptance by the Salon also came with a large cost for the truly creative and path breaking let us take for example the Impressionists such as Monet, which is the case study taken up by the book 1 It required creating the kind of art that they did not find meaningful,2 They risked being lost in the clutter of other artists work Was it worth it The Salon was the place where reputations were made And what made it special was how selective it was There were roughly three thousand painters of national reputation in France in the 1860s, and each submitted two or three of his best works to the Salon, which meant the jury was picking from a small mountain of canvases Rejection was the norm Getting in was a feat The Salon is the real field of battle, Manet said It s there that one must take one s measure. It was the place where you could succeed in making a noise, in defying and attracting criticism, coming face to face with the big public. But the very things that made the Salon so attractive how selective and prestigious it was also made it problematic.No painter could submitthan three works The crowds were often overwhelming The Salon was the Big Pond But it was very hard to be anything at the Salon but a Little Fish Night after night, the rebels the Impressionists argued over whether they should keep knocking on the Salon door or strike out on their own and stage a show just for themselves Did they want to be a Little Fish in the Big Pond of the Salon or a Big Fish in a Little Pond of their own choosing The problem for the rebels such as the Impressionists was The Salon s attitude it was cautious, traditional It had a reputation to uphold for being the voice of approval It could not afford to make mistakesWorks were expected to be microscopically accurate, properly finished and formally framed, with proper perspective and all the familiar artistic conventions, the art historian Sue Roe writes Light denoted high drama, darkness suggested gravitas In narrative painting, the scene should not only be accurate, but should also set a morally acceptable tone An afternoon at the Salon was like a night at the Paris Op ra audiences expected to be uplifted and entertained For the most part, they knew what they liked, and expected to see what they knew. The kinds of paintings that won medals, Roe says, were huge, meticulously painted canvases showing scenes from French history or mythology, with horses and armies or beautiful women, with titles like Soldier s Departure, Young Woman Weeping over a Letter, and Abandoned Innocence.The Impressionists, on the other hand, had an entirely different idea about what constituted art.They painted everyday life Their brushstrokes were visible Their figures were indistinct To the Salon jury and the crowds thronging the Palais, their work looked amateurish, even shocking, and was repeatedly turned down They had no hope of making waves in the Big Pond of The Salon The Big Fish Little Pond GambitPissarro and Monet were smarter They conjured up an alternative to the shackles of the Salon.They thought it madesense to be a Big Fish in a Little Pond If they were off by themselves and held their own show, they said, they wouldn t be bound by the restrictive rules of the Salon, where the medals were won by paintings of soldiers and weeping women They could paint whatever they wanted And they wouldn t get lost in the crowd, because there wouldn t be a crowd.In 1873, Pissarro and Monet proposed that the Impressionists set up a collective called the Soci t Anonyme Coop rative des Artistes Peintres, Sculpteurs, Graveurs There would be no competition, no juries, and no medals Every artist would be treated as an equal.The Impressionists exhibition opened on April 15, 1874, and lasted one month The entrance fee was one franc There were 165 works of art on display, including three C zannes, ten paintings by Degas, nine Monets, five Pissarros, six Renoirs, and five by Alfred Sisley a tiny fraction of what was on the walls of the Salon across town In their show, the Impressionists could exhibit as many canvases as they wished and hang them in a way that allowed people to actually see them.This was the first exhibition of Impressionism It was here that Critic Louis Leroy took the title of a work by Monet,Impression, Sunriseto deride exposure and then went on to qualify these artists, quite skeptically, as Impressionists The name stuck This historic show brought the artists some critical attention Not all of that attention was positive one joke in addition to the name impressionism itself told was that what the Impressionists were doing was loading a pistol with paint and firing at the canvas.But that was the second part of the Big Fish Little Pond bargain The Big Fish Little Pond option might be scorned by some on the outside, but Small Ponds are welcoming places for those on the inside They have all of the support that comes from community and friendship and they are places where innovation and individuality are not frowned upon We are beginning to make ourselves a niche, a hopeful Pissarro wrote to a friend We have succeeded as intruders in setting up our little banner in the midst of the crowd. Their challenge was to advance without worrying about opinion He was right Off by themselves, the Impressionists found a new identity They felt a new creative freedom, and before long, the outside world began to sit up and take notice.In the history of modern art, there has never been aimportant orfamous exhibition If you tried to buy the paintings in that warren of top floor rooms today, it would cost youthan a billion dollars In the end, the Impressionists were lucky to make the right choice, which is one of the reasons that their paintings hang in every major art museum in the world But this same dilemma comes up again and again, and often the choice made is not as wise.Their story should remind today s top artists and authors that there is a point at which money and mainstream recognition stop making them and start breaking them The story of the Impressionists suggests that when the artists authors strive for the best and attach great importance to getting into the Bestseller lists and Booker Lists, rarely do they stop and consider as the Impressionists did whether this is always in their best interest 1 One of the important lessons the Impressionists could teach the modern artists is that there are times and places where it is better to be a Big Fish in a Little Pond than a Little Fish in a Big Pond, where the apparent disadvantage of being an outsider in a marginal world turns out not to be a disadvantage at all.2 Another important lesson is that what counts in the end is if you let the Big Pond define you, or if you were brave enough to invent an alternative The answer might not always be a Little Pond, but it sure can t be meek acceptance of the current status quo path either.Think of all the great artists of the modern age who could hardly be defined as mainstream during their own lifetimes, who would never dream of writing for the approval of a committee, who were as far away from honors and awards and money as only exiles could be.Think of all the books with prestigious honors and the 1 bestseller mark that seem like jokes now.Think about how so many of our best authors seem to end up producing the same sort of exceptional trash very well written, but hardly the real deal that would last a century What then can be an alternative for the ones who want to break free We can talk about one option that our case study suggests it might not be the only option, and the creative ones can always come up with better option, but the exhortation of this reviewer is a simple one that the really ambitions artists and authors need to start thinking hard about the best use of their own abilities and efforts Added here from the comments section, for clarity To restate, in our day the artists have three options 1 Satisfy the Bank2 Satisfy the critics or impress 3 Or satisfy their own genius or impress The last being the most risky and perhaps most important one.So what is the winning option again For one thing, examples abound of niche novelists groups pushing the boundaries of literature, slowly attaining cult status and eventually becoming part of the canon itself Just as Pissarro, Monet, Renoir, and C zanne weighed prestige against visibility, selectivity against freedom, and decided the costs of the Big Pond were too great, it is time for the really serious to make the same call, of rejecting the conventional trappings of success that only serves to limit their possibilities No one does insight porn quite as well as Malcolm Gladwell His technique has been fairly well analysed before, and, with the publication of David and Goliath is currently under the spotlight again e.g and Even though much of the backlash often falls directly into the same traps of which he gets accused e.g critics cherry picking the parts of his books that best support their complaints , the key argument i No one does insight porn quite as well as Malcolm Gladwell His technique has been fairly well analysed before, and, with the publication of David and Goliath is currently under the spotlight again e.g and Even though much of the backlash often falls directly into the same traps of which he gets accused e.g critics cherry picking the parts of his books that best support their complaints , the key argument is generally quite valid Gladwell takes a minority, slightly counter intuitive, perspective, highlights some evidence that possibly supports it, and ignores alternative readings of the same stories, and all the evidence for different positions.The key question is how much does this matter One of the central concepts in this book is that of the inverted U curve where an increase in something is valuable for a while, but then starts to become a negative e.g drinking some alcohol is good for your health, but drinking too much causes problems Gladwell applies this to numerous other areas, from teacher student ratios, or the relationship between wealth and parenting, through to punishment for crimes But one question not asked in this book, or any review I ve seen of it so far, is whether Gladwell s own brand of pop science might have exactly the same curve, and whether he might actually now be at the wrong end of it This book contains two extended discussions on topics I know quite a lot about the conflict in Northern Ireland, and the interpretation of the Biblical story of David and Goliath In each there s an existing dominant narrative that is largely flawed But directly attacking a dominant narrative generally has little effect indeed, often simply reinforces it Aeffective approach to countering a position with which you disagree, and one that Gladwell is a master of, is to simply tell a better story with a different narrative There has been significant research on this area in recent years, particularly with respect to political debate, but there s also a long history of this in theology too, in the battles between heresy and orthodoxy On the left hand side of the inverted U curve, this is a very valuable function Handled well this approach stimulates thinking and debate and, hopefully, leads to a deeper andnuanced general understanding of the area But this relies on arriving at a synthesis of both positions The key problem with Gladwell, it seems to me, is that he s simply too good at what he does He s such a superb story teller that people read his books and come away convinced of his positions, accepting his narrative as being the complete truth itself, rather than simply as a valuable contribution to a wider debate and understanding.But I m unconvinced that this is a flaw with his books and columns themselves They re doing a very precise thing, and doing it very well And this one is no exception It s a delight to read, and raises a lot of very interesting and valuable questions And those who wish to challenge the answers it offers would do well to learn from the approach, and start telling better stories themselves Now, there is a lot of skepticism about Gladwell and his research methods, but whether he self selects his data or whatever, I think that the very nature of his writing indicates that his research isn t totally conclusive So why bother reading him Well, Gladwell, whether he s a legitimate social scientist or whatever the term is or not, is a pretty gifted writer He has a knack for telling stories and presenting dry information, like statistics, in a compelling way Plus, his theories are alw Now, there is a lot of skepticism about Gladwell and his research methods, but whether he self selects his data or whatever, I think that the very nature of his writing indicates that his research isn t totally conclusive So why bother reading him Well, Gladwell, whether he s a legitimate social scientist or whatever the term is or not, is a pretty gifted writer He has a knack for telling stories and presenting dry information, like statistics, in a compelling way Plus, his theories are always provoking, if not convincing.I like to read Gladwell asof a short story collector rather than reading his books as though they prove a single theory about humanity and how we live Taking his chapters in isolation, he uses the form of the case study to advance some interesting ideas and I don t always agree with him.So if we think of David and Goliath as a collection of case studies that loosely revolve around a particular theme power, the myth of advantage, and the underdog something Gladwell is particularly obsessed by , several chapter are capable of provoking conversation such as his chapter on class sizes Using a high school that can have classes as small as 12 kids, Gladwell talks about the too much of a good thing danger and succeeds in making us realize that small class sizes are not the golden solution to America s education problem and are not necessarily a good thingbut then he totally disrupts that train of thought when he validly mentions that a drop in class sizes across the board resulted in no appreciable gain because teachers weren t adapting their teaching methods.It seems to me that in his work there is always this give and take He gives you an idea and some evidence to back it upand then throws in some parallel story that either invalidates the first point or is completely irrelevant For instance, he takes the founder of the Three Strikes Law and talks about the tragic circumstances that led to the law s genesis He then talks about the problems of the law, weaves in some stuff about legitimate power and how cracking down harder on criminals is nonsense using Northern Ireland s history and a specific neighborhood in New York At this point, I m totally with it But then he throws in a story that s meant to parallel Reynold s story a family in Canada whose daughter is kidnapped and then years later found dead and subsequent investigations lead to the murderer being apprehended and then talks about how this Canadian family chooses not to use their daughter s case to bring about change of the legal system..and attributes this to their Mennonite background The overall effect is that it leaves the reader kind of confused and adds nothing to this underdog defeating the giant theme These kinds of problems occur throughout the entire book and the ending leads one to wonderwhat exactly was the point of all that, Gladwell Added to the fact that much of this book seems to deal with stuff that s way too similar to the ground he covered withOutliers , I d only recommend this book to teachers looking for excerpts to use to provoke criticality about bias and research or using excerpts to introduce an idea about power, justice, etc This guy writes so well He draws you in with beautifully crafted stories Murnane says in one of his books that he regretted having told people that some of his books were works of fiction and some essays I really believe that creativity is essential for both these writing tasks, and that because real art prefers to hide, there is a good argument to be had in believing thatcreativity is asked for in the writing of non fiction than in fiction.Not that this guy really hides his artifice H This guy writes so well He draws you in with beautifully crafted stories Murnane says in one of his books that he regretted having told people that some of his books were works of fiction and some essays I really believe that creativity is essential for both these writing tasks, and that because real art prefers to hide, there is a good argument to be had in believing thatcreativity is asked for in the writing of non fiction than in fiction.Not that this guy really hides his artifice His stories are painstakingly structured and his punches are delivered with such precision that it is hard not to want to applaud even as they slam into the side of your face.And I love that he leads me down the garden path I wonder how many people will be caught in the depths of their prejudices only to find the tables being turned It would be hard to make acompelling argument, for instance, in favour of the Californian three strikes and your in laws than he makes here or to find a way to so convincingly refute this emotional, logical and compelling argument almost immediately after.This book was infinitely confronting for me If I was paranoid then I would have to assume Gladwell had gone out of his way to find every topic I find almost unbearable to think about that somehow he had written this book as part of a bizarre vendetta against me I ve explained my problems with dyslexia before so want go through that again other than to say that I found this part of the book really hard going I wouldn t wish dyslexia on my worst enemy shame and humiliation are not toys to be played with As you can also see in that review, I m from Belfast and left just before the Troubles started That Gladwell discusses the internment here was and is and will always be like an open wound for me my childhood consisted of hearing stories of rubber bullets fired into crowds of protestors and spent singing songs about armoured cars and tanks and guns that came to take away our sons, of collective punishments meted out by unfeeling monsters and of whole populations being guilty because they were Irish Parts of this book held a mirror up to all of the things that made me feel different and odd and out of place in my childhood, all of the things that held me apart, and those things never really leave you, even if you haven t thought about them for years.And if you want to make me full of an unquenchable fury, then talk of collaborators with the Nazis turning in Jews so they can to be transported to the death camps Or of people refusing to buy clothes because a black person may have touched them Or of black children being arrested and checked for venereal disease as a means of humiliating them for asking for justice, for having to ask for what ought to have been theirs by birth right.And the worst of my nightmares are here too I am a father of two daughters This book was written to torture people like me Torture us by showing our nightmares made real, lived out in the lives of people we would empathise with, but Gladwell forces from usthan merely our empathy, he places us in their shoes he has us holding the hands of our own daughters as they lay dying or has us wait months to learn of their slow death by torture I let very few writers take me to those places.This book has opened and scattered salt across virtually every wound and every scar, real and imagined, of which my life is constituted All the same, read it This isn t a pleasant read by any stretch of the imagination, this isn t something which is fun but you ll remember this book and it will make you think and it will make you feel and there s not much else to ask from books What an excellent storyteller I love his mind I was smiling a lot It s stimulating These things are fun to think about.Not everything he says is irrefutable fact Some of his information is anecdotal But he raises good questions I think what he says is true, even though opposite or different views may be true Some topics were a little slow, but I was frequently delighted and fascinated.MY FAVORITE TOPICS The story of David and GoliathLess talented basketball players can win using full cou What an excellent storyteller I love his mind I was smiling a lot It s stimulating These things are fun to think about.Not everything he says is irrefutable fact Some of his information is anecdotal But he raises good questions I think what he says is true, even though opposite or different views may be true Some topics were a little slow, but I was frequently delighted and fascinated.MY FAVORITE TOPICS The story of David and GoliathLess talented basketball players can win using full court press.The best class size for one teacher was 29 Too small, 9 was bad The reason is students hadpeers There wasinteraction, dialogue, and energy among the students A class size of 36 was too large to be good.Two brilliant and talented students got into top colleges a science major at Brown and a math major at Harvard After two years they were so disheartened and disappointed that they switched to less rigorous majors The reason is they were surrounded by so many bright minds, they felt average or below average in those fields If they had gone to second tier schools, they would have been at the top of their classes and probably not changed majors.Dr Jay Freireich lacked empathy for his patients children with leukemia Therefore, he was willing to experiment with painful and dangerous procedures for these children things other doctors were unwilling to do Under the care of empathetic doctors, children died from leukemia But they were cured by Dr Freireich s procedures of repeated cocktails of painful drugs and large needles taking frequent and painful bone marrow samples It is suggested that his lack of empathy was caused by lack of parental nurturing and love when he was a child.Dyslexics developed abilities that brought them great success.OTHER TOPICS Too much money creates parenting problems.Different types of fear and lack of fear during the WWII bombings in London.Civil rights movement in Birmingham AlabamaThe British and Protestants vs the Catholics in IrelandCalifornia s three strikes and you re out jailing criminalsThe Huguenots in France protecting Jews during WWIII was pleased the author provided a PDF file that audiobook buyers could download It has the picture of the dog attacking a black man in Alabama which he talked about It also has charts and a few references.NARRATOR The author narrated this book His manner and voice were excellent soft, easy to listen to, and enthusiastic I d love to hear him narrate some of my fiction books.DATA Unabridged audiobook reading time 7 hrs Swearing language occasional f word Sexual content none Book copyright 2013 Genre Psychology Sociology Nonfiction This is classic Malcolm Gladwell A bunch of enjoyable and entertaining case studies grouped loosely under a thought provoking theme This time his theory is that being the underdog and having disadvantages can actually be an advantage.The title comes from a biblical story about a giant warrior named Goliath who was slain by David, a shepherd boy who was good with a slingshot Gladwell analyzes the story and determines that the boy was not, in fact, an underdog, but was actually was a skilled hu This is classic Malcolm Gladwell A bunch of enjoyable and entertaining case studies grouped loosely under a thought provoking theme This time his theory is that being the underdog and having disadvantages can actually be an advantage.The title comes from a biblical story about a giant warrior named Goliath who was slain by David, a shepherd boy who was good with a slingshot Gladwell analyzes the story and determines that the boy was not, in fact, an underdog, but was actually was a skilled hunter, and that Goliath didn t stand a chance against him.My favorite discussions in the book were about education, including the popular but apparently not true belief that small class sizes are always better There were also some good stories about choosing colleges, and students reading this may be surprised to learn that a high ranking school such as the Ivy League may not always be the best option for your career There was also a good discussion about dyslexia, and why having challenges to overcome could actually help motivate you to besuccessful.I finished this book a few days ago, and it is already fading fast from my mind, something that always happens to me with Gladwell books I find his writing pleasant and his ideas interesting, but the details don t always stick Recommended for those who want to feel like they ve learned something, but you don t want to think too hard I ve never hidden my stigmatized identity as an academic social scientist who loves Malcolm Gladwell Gladwell s books are routinely criticized by folks in my field for relying too heavily on anecdotes, conveniently selecting and interpreting supportive scientific studies, and imprecision overgeneralization These points are valid, but I don t see them as damning Gladwell isn t a scientist, and he s not writing textbooks Ideally, he helps spark people s interest in research and makes them wan I ve never hidden my stigmatized identity as an academic social scientist who loves Malcolm Gladwell Gladwell s books are routinely criticized by folks in my field for relying too heavily on anecdotes, conveniently selecting and interpreting supportive scientific studies, and imprecision overgeneralization These points are valid, but I don t see them as damning Gladwell isn t a scientist, and he s not writing textbooks Ideally, he helps spark people s interest in research and makes them want to knowand maybe less eager to de fund science I enjoy getting swept up in Gladwell s story telling and I like the way he weaves together a little research with a lot of engaging humanities human interest type stuff I don t always buy his arguments, and there s plenty to nit pick, but I admire and enjoy his rhetorical style His stories are juicy and memorable.David Goliath is similar to Gladwell s previous trilogy of social science y books The theme here is situations where underdogs prevail and giants fail to benefit from their seemingly obvious advantages As usual, the theme is diffuse and some of the stories aregermane, persuasive, or compelling than others Still, I enjoyed taking the somewhat meandering, but also thought provoking journey Malcolm Gladwell is one of those authors who you remember reading, but may not quite recall which book a particular phrase came from They re all pretty similar.But that s the beauty of Gladwell He s developing a coherent canon and, really, do you want to be surprised all the time The world is disconcerting enough already.The title, David and Goliath, tells you exactly what this book is about It s about the little guy who made good and, even better, who turned his adversities into strengths Malcolm Gladwell is one of those authors who you remember reading, but may not quite recall which book a particular phrase came from They re all pretty similar.But that s the beauty of Gladwell He s developing a coherent canon and, really, do you want to be surprised all the time The world is disconcerting enough already.The title, David and Goliath, tells you exactly what this book is about It s about the little guy who made good and, even better, who turned his adversities into strengths In Gladwellian fashion there are illustrative anecdotes from short basketball players, to orphaned children, to anti Nazi French villagers that expand upon the idea of less can beOr following the sometimes Biblical headers in the book The last shall be first.So why only three stars Because Gladwell is that sort of author Pretty predictable, but pretty good at it And always enjoyable.Follow me on Twitter Dr_A_Taubman

David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of
  • Hardcover
  • 305 pages
  • David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants
  • Malcolm Gladwell
  • English
  • 23 October 2019
  • 0316204366