Bad Blood: A Walk Along the Irish Border

Bad Blood: A Walk Along the Irish Border➵ [Reading] ➷ Bad Blood: A Walk Along the Irish Border By Colm Tóibín ➪ – Jobs-in-kingston.co.uk Soon after the Anglo Irish agreement, Colm Toibin travelled along the Irish border from Derry to Newry In this work he tells of fear and anger, and of the historical legacy that has imprinted itself o Soon A Walk Along the PDF/EPUB ² after the A Walk MOBI ï Anglo Irish agreement, Colm Toibin travelled along the Irish border from Derry to Newry In this work he tells of fear and anger, and of the historical legacy that has imprinted itself on the landscape and its inhabitants. This book was originally published as Walking Along the Border in 1987 It was republished in 1994 with a new title, and without the photographs I suppose the new title was intended to draw readers interested in Northern Ireland, as well as to reflect that this book isthan a travelogue Toibin, at the time he wrote this, was 32, living in Dublin, and working as a journalist This was the first of three non fiction books he wrote that could be categorized as travelogues The other two ar This book was originally published as Walking Along the Border in 1987 It was republished in 1994 with a new title, and without the photographs I suppose the new title was intended to draw readers interested in Northern Ireland, as well as to reflect that this book isthan a travelogue Toibin, at the time he wrote this, was 32, living in Dublin, and working as a journalist This was the first of three non fiction books he wrote that could be categorized as travelogues The other two are Homage to Barcelona 1990 and The Sign of the Cross Travels in Catholic Europe 1994 This book, like other books that are ostensibly about travel, is a study of the history and people, including a few writers, along the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland To bin made his trip during the height of the Troubles To bin walked the border in order to see up close what it meant Everywhere there were cement blockades, and other obstacles to stop traffic from using border crossings Many probably most bridges were destroyed This website features many interviews with residents along the border bin walked through rain, bad weather, British Army checkpoints, and at times hostile locals It is understandable that the sight of a stranger walking through near empty countryside could be startling At times, he walks miles through bad weather to a town that reportedly has a hotel, to find it has closed Many local and small businesses closed during the Troubles Sometimes it was after the closing of a bridge or border crossing meant that business dried up Other times, they were victims of bombings or other attacks The bridge crossings divided communities that had lived in harmony despite the border for decades Some of the closings dated back to the late 1950 s a time when a decimated IRA carried on a fruitless Border Campaign To bin is skilled at befriending locals and gaining some trust He interviews victims of atrocities, and in one interview, a survivor who has been reluctant to talk to the media over the previous ten years, opens up to To bin In a couple of situations where strong sectarian suspicions freeze him out, he manages to befriend a key local resident who lets others know the To bin is OK He also has friends living in the areas he is traveling who occasionally come to his rescue when he is stranded by bad weather, and or in a place with no accommodations In the age before mobile phones, and the internet, travelers were heavily dependent on the goodwill of locals There were, of course, no local tourist offices to give advice It was a seat of your pants way of traveling Considering he was traveling through areas that were essentially war zones , it was a remarkable journey To bin, however, wasn t the first to write about traveling in Northern Ireland during these years Dervla Murphy s remarkable book A Place Apart 1978 tells of traveling by bicycle through Northern Ireland, almost a decade before To bin.To bin s future as a writer of literary fiction is apparent in this book On his visit to Enniskillen, he writes about the great writer John McGahern, who lived just south of the border, but as To bin writes Enniskillen was sort of a capital for him To bin goes on to writeHe had written so well, so accurately, in such detail, about the world just south of the border that his work was almostreal than the places themselves It was a time when the police had nothing to do except arrest cyclists for having no lights, when there were no cars on the road, when personal isolation and pain found no comfort in the monolith southern Ireland had become This is a book for anyone interested in Northern Ireland, as well as fans of To bin Highly recommended.http www.bbc.com news uk northern i The other night at a reading by Northern Irish native Nick Laird, he was in conversation with a local writer who commented to me that he found it interesting that the 30 year war in Northern Ireland was referred to as the Troubles , an understatement, to say the least Reading this book now when Northern drivers flock to petrol stations in the Republic for cheap fuel to stations which had little business at the time Toibin writes , while Southerners stream across custom less, and checkpoint less borders for cheap booze, makes it stark how much has changed in the two decades plus that have passed But it also shows how deep the conflict ran It is a book that all people from this island of Ireland should read. I had traveled to Ireland a few years before Toibin went on his trek and was quite familiar with some of the people and events that he described.Colm is a great writer. Very good A bit hard to follow at times as he assumesfamiliarity with then current 1986 events than is likely at this late date His observational powers are phenomenal, so the travelogue portions are as affecting in their way the reportage from the border in the wake of Anglo Irish Agreement A real writer s piece of journalism in the best sense. Fascinating, earthy account of the everyday tensions on the Northern Ireland border in the late 80s Unfortunately somewhat mystifying and meandering for the less historically knowledgeable reader The most interesting thing was probably just how mundane the walk comes across when he is effectively walking in an ongoing warzone Also made me want to readon the topic of migrant fairs and the exploitation of Catholic workers by Protestant landowners, which had a clear legacy and role in the Fascinating, earthy account of the everyday tensions on the Northern Ireland border in the late 80s Unfortunately somewhat mystifying and meandering for the less historically knowledgeable reader The most interesting thing was probably just how mundane the walk comes across when he is effectively walking in an ongoing warzone Also made me want to readon the topic of migrant fairs and the exploitation of Catholic workers by Protestant landowners, which had a clear legacy and role in the conflict If you want to read a book about Ireland, this would be an interesting way to go A different twist Enjoyed it much, very clear and poignant. In the summer following the Anglo Irish agreement of 1985, Colm Toibin set off to walk the length of the Irish border from Derry Londonderry to Newry More than thirty years after his journey, Bad Blood is a fascinating record of a very different time the Good Friday agreement that finally brought the Troubles to a close was still twelve years in the future, and the Anglo Irish agreement had inflamed existing tensions, especially among Protestant communities Toibin talks to ordinary people on In the summer following the Anglo Irish agreement of 1985, Colm Toibin set off to walk the length of the Irish border from Derry Londonderry to Newry More than thirty years after his journey, Bad Blood is a fascinating record of a very different time the Good Friday agreement that finally brought the Troubles to a close was still twelve years in the future, and the Anglo Irish agreement had inflamed existing tensions, especially among Protestant communities Toibin talks to ordinary people on both sides of the border caught up in the terrible cycle of violence, reprisal and sectarianism that played out along the length of his journey Bad Blood is both a record of a time now passed and a warning of the dark forces that could be unleashed by a failure to take the border seriously in a post Brexit world Can be a bit of a dry read for the unitiated, but the stories Toibin shares from individuals and the lives they live on the border during the Troubles is fascinating People just try to live their lives, independent of their ethnic and sectarian identities, but their identities can sometimes overcome their way of life, independent of any choices they made or situations they tried to avoid. A high class reportage indeed, as described by the Irish times A valuable and seizing walk along the Irish border , helping to understand Grief, healing, faces and words, wounds, past, present and future. Toibin is my favorite writer, and this is not his best in terms of narrative, but it was a really unique reaction to the Anglo Irish agreement And he is such a good writer that I would read his observations about paint drying.

Bad Blood: A Walk Along the Irish Border PDF/EPUB ✓
  • Paperback
  • 193 pages
  • Bad Blood: A Walk Along the Irish Border
  • Colm Tóibín
  • English
  • 07 October 2019
  • 0330373587