The Eagles' Brood

The Eagles' Brood[Reading] ➼ The Eagles' Brood By Jack Whyte – Jobs-in-kingston.co.uk The Eagles Brood continues the saga of the Colony known as Camulod, and the tale of the descendants of those brave Romans who forged a new way of life for the Celt and Roman peoples when the Roman leg The Eagles Brood continues the saga of the Colony known as Camulod, and the tale of the descendants of those brave Romans who forged a new way of life for the Celt and Roman peoples when the Roman legions departed The Eagles' PDF/EPUB ² BritainMost know the new leader of the Colony as Merlyn all call him Commander Cauis Merlyn Britannicus is responsible for their safety, and all look to him. Not a review but As with the previous books, this was a great story, but the glossing over of some in my mind important events was a bit strange and ultimately made me remove a star from my rating.For those who have read this book view spoiler Cassandra Deirdre , Lot, and Uther s deaths left me feeling a bit unfulfilled I know we are in Merlyn s POV, and he wasn t present for these events, but still hide spoiler Edit after just finishing Uther I decided to bump this one from 4 st Not a review but As with the previous books, this was a great story, but the glossing over of some in my mind important events was a bit strange and ultimately made me remove a star from my rating.For those who have read this book view spoiler Cassandra Deirdre , Lot, and Uther s deaths left me feeling a bit unfulfilled I know we are in Merlyn s POV, and he wasn t present for these events, but still hide spoiler Edit after just finishing Uther I decided to bump this one from 4 stars to 5 because my complaints were answered in spectacular fashion in the later volume so better late than never Once again I am marveling at this series known as The Camulod Chronicles the vast epic story of the Legends of King Arthur, but told as historical novels rather than fantasy This is a series to savor over time rather than rush through from one book to the next, tempted as I am to do so simply because of the fantastic storytelling and pure reading enjoyment.This third volume starts a new chapter in the series as we have moved on to a new generation in the larger story The first two books Once again I am marveling at this series known as The Camulod Chronicles the vast epic story of the Legends of King Arthur, but told as historical novels rather than fantasy This is a series to savor over time rather than rush through from one book to the next, tempted as I am to do so simply because of the fantastic storytelling and pure reading enjoyment.This third volume starts a new chapter in the series as we have moved on to a new generation in the larger story The first two books are told from the viewpoint of Publius Varrus, but now we turn to events from his nephew s perspective, Caius Merlyn Britannicus That s right the Merlin of legend is now the narrator of the story but this is not the long white bearded old wizard we often think of, at least not yet He is a warrior and leader of men, much like his cousin and best friend, Uther Pendragon.This novel is a transitional book in the series as it takes us through the lives of the young Merlyn and Uther and ends with the discovery of a young 7 8 week old infant by the name of Arthur Butthan that, the largely idyllic story heretofore of the building of the Colony of Camulod Camelot and the advancement of ideas and invention has morphed into the inevitable war torn strife of our heroes defending against the invading Saxons and others Muchabout wars and battles in this one, and consequentlybrutal than the first two, culminating in the final battles between Uther and Lot of Cornwall It s also transitional in other ways as Merlyn s encounters with influential people he meets during his travels alter his perspectives on religion, culture, and the motivations of countries He comes to realize, for example, that the invading Saxons, whom he has always thought of as inherently evil, are really no different than his own ancestors, the Romans, who also invaded the British Isles No doubt these sorts of realizations will greatly affect his influence on Arthur.I love the way the author presents a wonderful sweeping saga of a story, building in all of the familiar aspects of the legend but keeping it all at such a rich personal level A hint of magic does sneak into this one in the form of a few Merlyn s dreams but they areprescience than sorcery I really want to know how these same events unfolded from Uther s perspective but alas I will have to wait, for Uther doesn t get his own book until 7 in the series Meanwhile I greatly look forward to the next installment, The Saxon Shore, wherein I hope to discover just what sort of adventures Merlyn will be having with his new ward, baby Arthur This book is part of a series of books based on the legends of King Arthur I ve read quite a few books based on Arthurian lore, but this series is unique It doesn t stand out for the quality of the writing, which is nothan decent It does stand out for the imagination and verisimilitude with which it uses history Few Arthurian books I ve read written in the last few decades are unabashed fantasy in the tradition of T.H White s The Once and Future King with a Merlin that lives backwards This book is part of a series of books based on the legends of King Arthur I ve read quite a few books based on Arthurian lore, but this series is unique It doesn t stand out for the quality of the writing, which is nothan decent It does stand out for the imagination and verisimilitude with which it uses history Few Arthurian books I ve read written in the last few decades are unabashed fantasy in the tradition of T.H White s The Once and Future King with a Merlin that lives backwards and changes Arthur into various animals, but most have some fantasy aspects Even Mary Stewart s Merlin Trilogy, which carefully does build in a solid historical context, still has a large element of magic Those two works are my favorite Arthurian tales by the way both Stewart and T.H White are wonderful writers What makes Whyte s series different, at least so far, is the complete lack of magic aside from some prescient dreams The first novel was The Skystone referring to a meteorite from which was forged Excalibur.That s what I mean about imagination Used not to build a magical system and a fantasy world, but a Camelot or rather here Camulod that truly might have existed within the cracks of what we know of Dark Age Britain Strictly speaking, this is not fantasy at all but well grounded historical fiction The narrator of the first two books is Arthur s great grandfather, Publius Varrus, and is set in the decades before Roman legions withdrew from Britain In this book, the narrative baton is passed on to a name right from the legends Merlyn, his nephew Merlyn, King Lot, Uther Pendragon are the characters that drive this story And Uther especially has an fascinating ambiguity and complexity I love good historical fiction, especially those that show me a side of history I didn t know One work of historical fiction, All Things Are Lights, is a favorite precisely because I knew nothing before reading it about the Cathars and the Albigensian Crusade Before reading it, I had thought Europe monolithically Roman Catholic during the Middle Ages I had no idea so much of France held with the Gnostic Cathars before they were wiped out by a Christian crusade called for by the Pope Similarly, I enjoyed in The Eagles Brood the picture of early Christianity, particularly the picture of the British Pelagius and his belief in free will and conflict with the followers of Augustine of Hippo I had never heard of Pelagius nor known that his teachings were widespread in Dark Age Britain It made me wonder if history might have taken a very different path had his ideas won out The book s picture of history is also interesting in many other ways This may not be historical fantasy, but it is among other things military fiction the invention of the stirrup and the flail are important elements in the story.The novel does have its flaws I mentioned that I don t think Whyte s in the same league as T.H White or Stewart His sex scenes particularly struck me as none too graceful And god, the coincidences Two incidents in particular struck me as implausible as some of theludicrous plot points in Shakespearean comedy where brothers who didn t know of each other s existence just happen to bump into each other I thought some parts frankly dragged, which is the main reason this book is rated one star less than the first book in the series But this novel does get rated as high as it is, because I do find Whyte s picture of Dark Ages Britain, and the way he finds credible realistic ways to render the familiar Arthurian legend, fascinating Round up to 3.5 stars Should be The Eagles Brood.the Eagles Brood about ten years ago and though a different title, this is still a great book Hate the new name and new order of series, which defies logic But love the book Only fourth book I ve re read and others were first two in the series and a Douglas Jackson book. The Eagle s Brood brings this pre Arthurian tale to an important junction the birth of King Arthur Along the way, Caius Merlyn suspects his cousin, Uther, of an act or outrageous barbarism upon a young woman He brings the woman to his secret hideaway nicknamed Avalon and there nurses her back to health and eventually to love In the meantime, the question burns DID UTHER DO THIS THING The question in my mind Was Whyte watching pornography when he dreamed up the conflict between Uther The Eagle s Brood brings this pre Arthurian tale to an important junction the birth of King Arthur Along the way, Caius Merlyn suspects his cousin, Uther, of an act or outrageous barbarism upon a young woman He brings the woman to his secret hideaway nicknamed Avalon and there nurses her back to health and eventually to love In the meantime, the question burns DID UTHER DO THIS THING The question in my mind Was Whyte watching pornography when he dreamed up the conflict between Uther and Merlyn s eventual love interest IN other words, it got very explicit and I felt a bit degraded trying to get through it In other novels, the sexual conquests, etc all played an important part in the plotting, but this time Whyte departs from what seems to be a simple conjoining to move the plot along in favor of describing a full scale orgy He makes his point, but not before offending the most sensible of his readers who, I imagine, can recognize the stretch of reality s fabric as a plot mechanism that was poorly contrived, and poorly developed, and in poor taste.I don t want to offer any spoilers but much of this novel deals with the relationship between Merlyn and his love but along the way we meet King Lot s evil magician assasins Whyte provides a real world explanation for their supposed magic as well as how it fell into the hands of Merlyn likely to be used in later books and winds the novel up without really answering the question about Uther s act of criminal rage or his actual character Uther remains in the story, the most poorly developed character ever Whyte never moves the reader to love or hate leaving him to float forever in apathy That Merlyn loves his cousin is never in doubt.The author manages to leave the reader hanging at an awkward place in the storyline I applaud Whyte s efforts to discuss economic and religious culture, the effects of technology upon the changing of the land from Roman to Briton, and the writer has a wonderful style that at times, forces me to use a dictionary to assay a clever a turn of phrase to see if it makes sense Merlyn has become the focus of this series, and likely shall be as we see young Arthur grow up as he is doing in the SAXON SHORE which I am now about halfway through Still, this reader would becomfortable if the author stopped trying to be pornographic and just continued to be graphic in his wonderful descriptions of the land, the people, the culture, the weapons, the technology of forging materials and candle making, and so on Sex most certainly has a place in this story it just doesn t need to be so vivid to make its point For me, The Eagle s Brood was such a sad book I had to say goodbye to some of my favourite characters from the previous two books Picus, Publius Varrus and Equus Although Caius Merlyn doesn t have the flair and sense of humour of Publius Varrus, I really did grow to love him as a narrator.The characters were great in this We see everything through Merlyn s eyes, with all of his judgments and flaws He s a good person but not a perfect character and gradually realizes his flaws He can be mor For me, The Eagle s Brood was such a sad book I had to say goodbye to some of my favourite characters from the previous two books Picus, Publius Varrus and Equus Although Caius Merlyn doesn t have the flair and sense of humour of Publius Varrus, I really did grow to love him as a narrator.The characters were great in this We see everything through Merlyn s eyes, with all of his judgments and flaws He s a good person but not a perfect character and gradually realizes his flaws He can bethan a little judgmental and arrogant at times, but I love how the perspective is told from his older self looking back on his youth It brings a littlebalance to the equation and I loved Merlyn all thefor it Uther was an okay character, but we didn t really get to see much of the good side of him at all That s why I feel I need to reread Uther the standalone Jack Whyte later wrote from Uther s perspective to fully understand him better.The plot wasn t the most fast moving at the beginning, but the last few hundred pages went fast The familiar Arthurian mythology we all know and love is now present almost all of the way through the novel and combined with the other events like the war with Lot, this made for a fast read If you re just picking this book up without reading the first two in A Dream of Eagles you won t appreciate it as much, but each of Jack Whyte s books can stand on their own.I can t and won t really comment on the historical accuracy of The Eagles Brood Although the main events of the novel are correct the Romans withdrew from Britain, the Saxons started raiding the shores, tribes squabbled for control while the remaining Romans in the province tried to restore some order I have a feeling that most of Jack Whyte s novel is historically accurate because of what I know of ancient Rome as well as how he really sucks you into that period of time You really do feel like you re there and that s something I ve always admired in him as a writer.Despite some rather graphic, disturbing scenes I really did enjoy The Eagles Brood I d highly recommend A Dream of Eagles series to anyone who enjoys the Arthurian legends, with or without magical elements.I give this book 5 5 stars Initially a one star review may seem harsh, hostile or something else vindictive but hopefully I ll elucidate on why I felt that the only realistic score for me personally.The frustrating thing about Jack Whyte is that you only have to dip into one of his books to recognise that he has an undeniable talent at creating believable, realistic tangible characters and an atmosphere that is rich in detail immersive He just believes fervently in burying all that positive plus points beneath rhe Initially a one star review may seem harsh, hostile or something else vindictive but hopefully I ll elucidate on why I felt that the only realistic score for me personally.The frustrating thing about Jack Whyte is that you only have to dip into one of his books to recognise that he has an undeniable talent at creating believable, realistic tangible characters and an atmosphere that is rich in detail immersive He just believes fervently in burying all that positive plus points beneath rhetorical tonnes of bland greyness and wistful meanderings, to the extent that all enjoyment and thrill is utterly sucked out of the story, leaving nothing but a dessicated husk of what could have been.This book in particular is arguably where the author feels most at liberty to pontificate, ruminate and generally bore the brains out of the reader Wistful thinking, eulogising, pondering and theologising yes, ruminations on spiritual discourse make up the bulk of this book, to the extent where you can skip whole pages and still feel weighted down and sinking fast.Another element that seriously undermines the authors abilities is his obsession with randomly using obscure over the top words like propitiate or concupiscent , so that if and when you finally build some sort of momentum in the story, you feel like you ve stumbled and tripped over and have to start all over again.I ll reiterate, the author is clearly a talented writer with the depth of detail and ability to weave an immersive atmosphere It s just such a shame that he feels the need for bury it beneath such banal frills and pompous adornments.I truly admire anyone who will be able to make it to the nearly five hundred page end of this book as getting to page 200 alone was an epic feat of effort which felt like double the distance.This was the book that broke the series for me Strongly doubt I ll bother with any of the rest As this is a prequel , I ve read it out of publishing order to fit in with the storyline s chronology Recommended for Lovers of Arthurian Legend, Lovers of Feasible Historical FictionThis third installment in Whyte s A Dream of Eagles series eclipses the first two It skips a generation from the previous narrator, smith Publius Varrus, to Caius Merlyn Britannicus, a very particular and believable take on the Merlin character.While the story lacks a tidy development arc, there are subplots that keep it interesting The bread and butter of this book, though, is the writing itself There a Recommended for Lovers of Arthurian Legend, Lovers of Feasible Historical FictionThis third installment in Whyte s A Dream of Eagles series eclipses the first two It skips a generation from the previous narrator, smith Publius Varrus, to Caius Merlyn Britannicus, a very particular and believable take on the Merlin character.While the story lacks a tidy development arc, there are subplots that keep it interesting The bread and butter of this book, though, is the writing itself There are some fiercely elegant passages that beg to be read aloud and flow off the tongue One such, in the Penguin edition I read, begins on page 402 and does not let up until page 405 It is a one sided conversation between two very different men who both have reason to be critical of each other, and the language used, the pacing of it, could easily be taken out of reality It is the caring criticism of one friend to another, coloured ever so slightly by infuriation and jealousy, by defense of ego and a tragic sense that one will never be as great as the other It is beautiful This passage alone made the book worth reading to me.The only thing I can fault in The Eagle s Brood is a short range of characters Not the characters themselves, mind you most of them are well rounded enough to be curious and engaging It sthat too many of the characters are too alike, to the degree that they don t have their own voices, and at times it seems like one s words are flowing through another s mouth I would ve liked a littledistinction there.Otherwise, the scenes are painted beautifully, the characters are breathed to life with description, action, and powerful words, and the action is sufficient to not let the epic lag Realistic reimagining of the Arthurian legend, about Merlyn and Uther before Arthur s birth Lots of military battles, and Whyte is a compelling storyteller I also like how he portrayed the source of Merlyn s reputation as a sorcerer, and how he fit all these various legendary elements like Excalibur and Camelot into a historically believable world.I m a tad let down by the portrayal of women, in particular Cassandra whom Merlyn loved She was deaf and mute and loved staring at him adoringly wh Realistic reimagining of the Arthurian legend, about Merlyn and Uther before Arthur s birth Lots of military battles, and Whyte is a compelling storyteller I also like how he portrayed the source of Merlyn s reputation as a sorcerer, and how he fit all these various legendary elements like Excalibur and Camelot into a historically believable world.I m a tad let down by the portrayal of women, in particular Cassandra whom Merlyn loved She was deaf and mute and loved staring at him adoringly while he talked He protected her and I like that Whyte made it clear that their romance was her choice, but the whole thing just left a bad taste in my mouth, especially when later on, Merlyn learns about her true identity I m reminded that Cassandra was the name he just gave her because she physically couldn t tell them what her name actually was, and I also realize that for all his professions of love, Merlyn knew nothing at all about who this woman is no big dramatic secret, just basic info like her family and country of origin and that his big love for her was due to her physical affection and sweet, adoring gazes Blech.There s also a subplot that involves rape a woman has sex with a man who is drugged and unconscious The story delves into the effect on the woman s reputation if it comes out, and touches on the issue of the man s consent he mostly thought he was dreaming of sex with an imaginary woman , but ultimately treats the bit about consent as no harm, no foul since the man barely realized it was happening and basically just thought he was having good dreams And I get that this book was written years ago, and that it was set centuries ago, when ideas around rape and consent were treated differently, but it still felt ick

The Eagles' Brood ePUB ë The Eagles'  PDF/EPUB ²
  • Paperback
  • 416 pages
  • The Eagles' Brood
  • Jack Whyte
  • English
  • 17 November 2018
  • 0765304597