Gluttony

Gluttony[Ebook] ➭ Gluttony ➬ Francine Prose – Jobs-in-kingston.co.uk In America, notes acclaimed novelist Francine Prose, we are obsessed with food and diet And what is this obsession with food except a struggle between sin and virtue, overeating and self control a str In America, notes acclaimed novelist Francine Prose, we are obsessed with food and diet And what is this obsession with food except a struggle between sin and virtue, overeating and self control a struggle with the fierce temptations of Gluttony In Gluttony, Francine Prose serves up a marvelous banquet of witty and engaging observations on this most delicious of deadly sins She traces how our notions of Gluttony have evolved along with our ideas about salvation and damnation, health and illness, life and death Offering a lively smorgasbord that ranges from Augustine s Confessions and Chaucer s Pardoner s Tale, to Petronius s Satyricon and Dante s Inferno, she shows that Gluttony was in medieval times a deeply spiritual matter, but today we have transformed Gluttony from a sin into an illness it is the horrors of cholesterol and the perils of red meat that we demonize Indeed, the modern take on Gluttony is that we overeat out of compulsion, self destructiveness, or to avoid intimacy and social contact But Gluttony, Prose reminds us, is also an affirmation of pleasure and of passion She ends the book with a discussion of MFK Fisher s idiosyncratic defense of one of the great heroes of Gluttony, Diamond Jim Brady, whose stomach was six times normal size The broad, shiny face of the glutton, Prose writes, has been and continues to be the mirror in which we see ourselves, our hopes and fears, our darkest dreams and deepest desires Never have we delved deeply into this mirror than in this insightful and stimulating book. Again and again, I m drawn to Francine Prose s fascinating ideas I m drawn into her clear way of presenting intriguing places and people and ideas I will likely finish whatever book of her s that I pick up But I will be somewhat disappointed that each book at least drawing from what I ve encountered so far flirts with depth without actually diving in.Take Gluttony, for example, which was part of the New York Public Library s Seven Deadly Sins series In it, Prose spends most of her time d Again and again, I m drawn to Francine Prose s fascinating ideas I m drawn into her clear way of presenting intriguing places and people and ideas I will likely finish whatever book of her s that I pick up But I will be somewhat disappointed that each book at least drawing from what I ve encountered so far flirts with depth without actually diving in.Take Gluttony, for example, which was part of the New York Public Library s Seven Deadly Sins series In it, Prose spends most of her time discussing her bewilderment that gluttony would be named a sin, particularly given that itsgeneralized counterpart greed is also one Why is the specific act of overeating, or eating with gusto, picked out for special notice as a sin How does it resonate with a contemporary America so obsessed with food and dieting These are the brilliant questions that Prose raises But her response felt underwhelming In the book s concluding chapter, she spends a great deal of time quoting the wise M.F.K Fisher s defense of gluttony The chapter s final lines read like so Over the centuries, our notions of gluttony have evolved along with our ideas about food and the body, about society and the individual, about salvation and damnation, health and illness, life and death However one praises or condemns this problematic and eternally seductive deadly sin, one thing seems clear the broad, shiny face of the glutton has been and continues to be the mirror in which we see ourselves, our hopes and fears, our darkest dreams and deepest desires To me, it all seems too generalized to resonate What came before wasn t enough to infuse these lines with singularity And granted, this book is a mere 100 page thing I shouldn t expect it to be all encompassing But I wantedThis brief book could have held .I was left with questions that begged asking, questions that Prose seemed to skirt Could gluttony as a sin be specifically addressing the peculiar shame of eatingthan we need in a world where others starve Could gluttony be a sin, over and beyond greed, because it leads to imbalance in our bodies, or because it reveals a lack of reverence for our physicality and for the earth that grows our food Is there a real reason why gluttony is not something we would characterize as a Top Seven sin today, something that reveals a notable chance in today s society from the ones that came before us Prose elides these questions She rather affirms eating as a joy and I agree with her in the face of gluttony as a historic sin, and that s that.The trouble with Francine Prose is that there s no follow through She has the most wonderful ideas, she brings together far reaching and thoughtful literary references, but it just doesn t go much further than isn t it interesting And it is interesting Which is why I very well may read another Francine Prose book, despite what I discuss here But if I do, I ll likely be nagged by the persistent wish that she d push harder, that she d analyze , that she d welcomenuance head on I want her books to move not just laterally, but also longitudinally multi directional ideas rather than ones that flatline.Prose is a very prolific woman, and an intelligent one Maybe it is yet to be Review originally published on Isak www.isak.typepad.com Prose notes that our culture has a mixed relationship with food, simultaneously believing eating to be giving in to sinful indulgence while always being on the lookout for the trendiest restaurant and the newest exotic ingredient And yet, gluttony itself hasto do with desire and appetite than actual consumption, at least according to early church fathers according to Francine Prose , and so Precisely because of our inordinate interests, our preoccupation with sampling the trendiest di Prose notes that our culture has a mixed relationship with food, simultaneously believing eating to be giving in to sinful indulgence while always being on the lookout for the trendiest restaurant and the newest exotic ingredient And yet, gluttony itself hasto do with desire and appetite than actual consumption, at least according to early church fathers according to Francine Prose , and so Precisely because of our inordinate interests, our preoccupation with sampling the trendiest dishes at the costliest new restaurants, and our apparently paradoxical, obsessive horror of obesity, we have become a culture of gluttons And yet, because gluttony is ostensibly the most outwardly visible of the deadly sins, we stigmatize it greatly The damage inflicted by the cruelty and contempt with which the overweight are routinely burlesqued in the media pales in comparison to the harm caused by the discrimination they face in the process of gainign admissions to ollege and finding a job Employers, it has been shown, not only tend to assume that a fat person will be less reliable, energetic, and efficient, but are reluctant to hire the overweight for positions receptionists, ect in which their size might affect the delicate sensibilities oif potential customers and the general public Fat people often have difficulty in getting health insurance and in obtaining adequate medical care, for many doctors as yetstudies have demonstrated display an unseemly and unprofessional dismissiveness towards their overweight patients In addition, the obese often find it challenging to carry out the sort of quotidian activities that most of us take for granted buying clothes, sitting comfortably in theaters, on airplanes, trains, and buses, and even getting through turnstiles designed for the ectomorphic subway rider Recently Southwest Airlines passed a rule requiring passengers over a certain weight to purchase two seats In what is perhaps the most disturbing recent development of all, states have now begun to get tough on parents thought to be too lax about their child s diet A three year old girl named Anamarie Martinez Regino was taken from her home because her parents were unwilling or unable to persuade or force her to lose weight And yet, even with all of that, try watching TV for a few minutes without being advertised something containing 1,000 calories orProse believes it s a combination of Puritan values of eschewing pleasure and capitalism One minute we re bombarded with images of food, advertisements for restaurants or the latest sweet or fatty snack, with recipes and cooking tips A minute later, we re reminded that eating is tantamount to suicide, that indulgence and enjoyment equals social isolation and self destruction And someone is making money from both sides of our ambivalence about, and fascination with, food, diet, gluttony, and starvation And so, Prose s book deals muchwith how we view and deal with gluttony as a culture than I think the other books do, but I have yet to finish any of them so maybe that s not the case She spends a good amount of time describing images of gluttony in literature and art, specifically the torments of the gluttonous in hell Good times Prose is a lovely writer which, good thing, considering the name and all and a good thinker, so there s lots to like in this volume of the NYC Library Oxford Press series, including the world s greatest story about unintentional gluttony, involving oysters and a dreadful poetry reading and a masterful use of Gregory the Great s summation of gluttony Too soon, too delicately, too greedily, too much as a recurring anchor phrase throughout She is lively and studious at once plus did I menti Prose is a lovely writer which, good thing, considering the name and all and a good thinker, so there s lots to like in this volume of the NYC Library Oxford Press series, including the world s greatest story about unintentional gluttony, involving oysters and a dreadful poetry reading and a masterful use of Gregory the Great s summation of gluttony Too soon, too delicately, too greedily, too much as a recurring anchor phrase throughout She is lively and studious at once plus did I mention the lovely writing and brought what might be one of your fustier sins to some kind of life Still, this just didn t ring my bell like Joseph Epstein s Envy , which I read first in the series because it is the sin which most plagues me , and which remains the one to beat Quickly skimmed waiting at dentist s office a long, double appointment , and glad to have done so, mainly because I really hadn t thought about gluttony in any depth before Lots of great historical, religiuos, and artistic references to pursue later particularly the paintings Loved the citations to MFk Fisher as a counter voice.Prose is a marvelous writer haven t read much by her, but will be on the look out for .And funny, I was just yesterday trying to parse out gourmand versus g Quickly skimmed waiting at dentist s office a long, double appointment , and glad to have done so, mainly because I really hadn t thought about gluttony in any depth before Lots of great historical, religiuos, and artistic references to pursue later particularly the paintings Loved the citations to MFk Fisher as a counter voice.Prose is a marvelous writer haven t read much by her, but will be on the look out for .And funny, I was just yesterday trying to parse out gourmand versus gourmet The word glutton never crossed my mind Itvis a fine word A compilation of literary texts from the Bible and Classic Literature to Augustine and Aquinas and the Church Fathers to Fielding and the 20th Century science as well as interpretations of Fine Art, Prose reports and presents although she writes well, sadly, she offers few insights into the malady we now call obesity. Beautifully written exploration of how gluttony manifests and is discussed in historical religious and modern societal realms Forced me to question what modern perception of the glutton means for the values that members of society like myself hold Several dense excerpts could have been trimmed and better embedded into Prose s writing I would have likeddiscussion about gluttony in the form of drink in Prose s discussion of the compulsive forces at play in gluttony touching on alcoholi Beautifully written exploration of how gluttony manifests and is discussed in historical religious and modern societal realms Forced me to question what modern perception of the glutton means for the values that members of society like myself hold Several dense excerpts could have been trimmed and better embedded into Prose s writing I would have likeddiscussion about gluttony in the form of drink in Prose s discussion of the compulsive forces at play in gluttony touching on alcoholism as an addiction and disease would have been interesting Francine Prose s Gluttony looks focuses on how the title sin feels both like particularly idiosyncratic anachronism or incredibly relevant Prose s primary concern is the tension between the way gluttony is viewed and morphed half admired secretly, half seen as the primary gateway to other sins, Prose traces the idea from its medieval incarnation to through the early modern period and the various depictions of glutton hells to our current obsession with weight loss and yet increasing girth A b Francine Prose s Gluttony looks focuses on how the title sin feels both like particularly idiosyncratic anachronism or incredibly relevant Prose s primary concern is the tension between the way gluttony is viewed and morphed half admired secretly, half seen as the primary gateway to other sins, Prose traces the idea from its medieval incarnation to through the early modern period and the various depictions of glutton hells to our current obsession with weight loss and yet increasing girth A bit unfocused but there are nice gems of insight in it After spending much of the book on a chapter about early Christian views on the sin of gluttony, and some art works, she then jumps to modern day weight issues Obesity is not gluttony, so not sure why spend time on it in this slim volume Then some quick examples of gluttony and views on gluttony in the 20th C Issue with OUP as well read as an ebook, and the numerous footnotes in the text are not hyperlinked to the citations in the back of the book Luckily I found after 3 or 4 of them that After spending much of the book on a chapter about early Christian views on the sin of gluttony, and some art works, she then jumps to modern day weight issues Obesity is not gluttony, so not sure why spend time on it in this slim volume Then some quick examples of gluttony and views on gluttony in the 20th C Issue with OUP as well read as an ebook, and the numerous footnotes in the text are not hyperlinked to the citations in the back of the book Luckily I found after 3 or 4 of them that they weren t worth looking at citation only, no further information provided in the footnotes , and so not worth the clumsy effort to get back and forth between the text, the footnote and back to the text The bibliography feels like filler, as does the index, in a 128 pp book Also included in that are pages of illustrations, most of them not even discussed in the text do we really need a painting of St Augustine The Bosch and Bruegel, yes but not many of the others Grab a used copy if you come across one at a reasonable price, you can pretty much read this in one sitting This book is a brief account of the cultural history of the sin of gluttony According to the book there are historically two reasons that gluttony has been considered deadly First, gluttony can be seen as a form of idolatry in which worship of sensual pleasure replaces worship of God, and second, gluttony weakens our resolve, opening the door to lechery and debauchery It seems to me that on a deeper level, gluttony may perhaps be sinful because of the fraught nature of the relation between This book is a brief account of the cultural history of the sin of gluttony According to the book there are historically two reasons that gluttony has been considered deadly First, gluttony can be seen as a form of idolatry in which worship of sensual pleasure replaces worship of God, and second, gluttony weakens our resolve, opening the door to lechery and debauchery It seems to me that on a deeper level, gluttony may perhaps be sinful because of the fraught nature of the relation between the body and the spirit in Christianity If these two entities are opposed, then that which feeds the flesh starves the spirit and vice versa This great little book discusses the history and development of how society views the sin of gluttony It readslike an in depth article than a book, and certainly generates a lotquestions than answers, but I appreciated how Prose casts the acts of overeating and undereating in a historical, rather than merely nutritional, light.I bought this book solely because one of my favorite authors wrote it, but now I am curious about the rest of the collection Ugh, just what I don t need in m This great little book discusses the history and development of how society views the sin of gluttony It readslike an in depth article than a book, and certainly generates a lotquestions than answers, but I appreciated how Prose casts the acts of overeating and undereating in a historical, rather than merely nutritional, light.I bought this book solely because one of my favorite authors wrote it, but now I am curious about the rest of the collection Ugh, just what I don t need in my cramped apartment sixbooks

Paperback  ↠ Gluttony Kindle ¿
    EPUB is an ebook file format that uses the epub normal size The broad, shiny face of the glutton, Prose writes, has been and continues to be the mirror in which we see ourselves, our hopes and fears, our darkest dreams and deepest desires Never have we delved deeply into this mirror than in this insightful and stimulating book. Again and again, I m drawn to Francine Prose s fascinating ideas I m drawn into her clear way of presenting intriguing places and people and ideas I will likely finish whatever book of her s that I pick up But I will be somewhat disappointed that each book at least drawing from what I ve encountered so far flirts with depth without actually diving in.Take Gluttony, for example, which was part of the New York Public Library s Seven Deadly Sins series In it, Prose spends most of her time d Again and again, I m drawn to Francine Prose s fascinating ideas I m drawn into her clear way of presenting intriguing places and people and ideas I will likely finish whatever book of her s that I pick up But I will be somewhat disappointed that each book at least drawing from what I ve encountered so far flirts with depth without actually diving in.Take Gluttony, for example, which was part of the New York Public Library s Seven Deadly Sins series In it, Prose spends most of her time discussing her bewilderment that gluttony would be named a sin, particularly given that itsgeneralized counterpart greed is also one Why is the specific act of overeating, or eating with gusto, picked out for special notice as a sin How does it resonate with a contemporary America so obsessed with food and dieting These are the brilliant questions that Prose raises But her response felt underwhelming In the book s concluding chapter, she spends a great deal of time quoting the wise M.F.K Fisher s defense of gluttony The chapter s final lines read like so Over the centuries, our notions of gluttony have evolved along with our ideas about food and the body, about society and the individual, about salvation and damnation, health and illness, life and death However one praises or condemns this problematic and eternally seductive deadly sin, one thing seems clear the broad, shiny face of the glutton has been and continues to be the mirror in which we see ourselves, our hopes and fears, our darkest dreams and deepest desires To me, it all seems too generalized to resonate What came before wasn t enough to infuse these lines with singularity And granted, this book is a mere 100 page thing I shouldn t expect it to be all encompassing But I wantedThis brief book could have held .I was left with questions that begged asking, questions that Prose seemed to skirt Could gluttony as a sin be specifically addressing the peculiar shame of eatingthan we need in a world where others starve Could gluttony be a sin, over and beyond greed, because it leads to imbalance in our bodies, or because it reveals a lack of reverence for our physicality and for the earth that grows our food Is there a real reason why gluttony is not something we would characterize as a Top Seven sin today, something that reveals a notable chance in today s society from the ones that came before us Prose elides these questions She rather affirms eating as a joy and I agree with her in the face of gluttony as a historic sin, and that s that.The trouble with Francine Prose is that there s no follow through She has the most wonderful ideas, she brings together far reaching and thoughtful literary references, but it just doesn t go much further than isn t it interesting And it is interesting Which is why I very well may read another Francine Prose book, despite what I discuss here But if I do, I ll likely be nagged by the persistent wish that she d push harder, that she d analyze , that she d welcomenuance head on I want her books to move not just laterally, but also longitudinally multi directional ideas rather than ones that flatline.Prose is a very prolific woman, and an intelligent one Maybe it is yet to be Review originally published on Isak www.isak.typepad.com Prose notes that our culture has a mixed relationship with food, simultaneously believing eating to be giving in to sinful indulgence while always being on the lookout for the trendiest restaurant and the newest exotic ingredient And yet, gluttony itself hasto do with desire and appetite than actual consumption, at least according to early church fathers according to Francine Prose , and so Precisely because of our inordinate interests, our preoccupation with sampling the trendiest di Prose notes that our culture has a mixed relationship with food, simultaneously believing eating to be giving in to sinful indulgence while always being on the lookout for the trendiest restaurant and the newest exotic ingredient And yet, gluttony itself hasto do with desire and appetite than actual consumption, at least according to early church fathers according to Francine Prose , and so Precisely because of our inordinate interests, our preoccupation with sampling the trendiest dishes at the costliest new restaurants, and our apparently paradoxical, obsessive horror of obesity, we have become a culture of gluttons And yet, because gluttony is ostensibly the most outwardly visible of the deadly sins, we stigmatize it greatly The damage inflicted by the cruelty and contempt with which the overweight are routinely burlesqued in the media pales in comparison to the harm caused by the discrimination they face in the process of gainign admissions to ollege and finding a job Employers, it has been shown, not only tend to assume that a fat person will be less reliable, energetic, and efficient, but are reluctant to hire the overweight for positions receptionists, ect in which their size might affect the delicate sensibilities oif potential customers and the general public Fat people often have difficulty in getting health insurance and in obtaining adequate medical care, for many doctors as yetstudies have demonstrated display an unseemly and unprofessional dismissiveness towards their overweight patients In addition, the obese often find it challenging to carry out the sort of quotidian activities that most of us take for granted buying clothes, sitting comfortably in theaters, on airplanes, trains, and buses, and even getting through turnstiles designed for the ectomorphic subway rider Recently Southwest Airlines passed a rule requiring passengers over a certain weight to purchase two seats In what is perhaps the most disturbing recent development of all, states have now begun to get tough on parents thought to be too lax about their child s diet A three year old girl named Anamarie Martinez Regino was taken from her home because her parents were unwilling or unable to persuade or force her to lose weight And yet, even with all of that, try watching TV for a few minutes without being advertised something containing 1,000 calories orProse believes it s a combination of Puritan values of eschewing pleasure and capitalism One minute we re bombarded with images of food, advertisements for restaurants or the latest sweet or fatty snack, with recipes and cooking tips A minute later, we re reminded that eating is tantamount to suicide, that indulgence and enjoyment equals social isolation and self destruction And someone is making money from both sides of our ambivalence about, and fascination with, food, diet, gluttony, and starvation And so, Prose s book deals muchwith how we view and deal with gluttony as a culture than I think the other books do, but I have yet to finish any of them so maybe that s not the case She spends a good amount of time describing images of gluttony in literature and art, specifically the torments of the gluttonous in hell Good times Prose is a lovely writer which, good thing, considering the name and all and a good thinker, so there s lots to like in this volume of the NYC Library Oxford Press series, including the world s greatest story about unintentional gluttony, involving oysters and a dreadful poetry reading and a masterful use of Gregory the Great s summation of gluttony Too soon, too delicately, too greedily, too much as a recurring anchor phrase throughout She is lively and studious at once plus did I menti Prose is a lovely writer which, good thing, considering the name and all and a good thinker, so there s lots to like in this volume of the NYC Library Oxford Press series, including the world s greatest story about unintentional gluttony, involving oysters and a dreadful poetry reading and a masterful use of Gregory the Great s summation of gluttony Too soon, too delicately, too greedily, too much as a recurring anchor phrase throughout She is lively and studious at once plus did I mention the lovely writing and brought what might be one of your fustier sins to some kind of life Still, this just didn t ring my bell like Joseph Epstein s Envy , which I read first in the series because it is the sin which most plagues me , and which remains the one to beat Quickly skimmed waiting at dentist s office a long, double appointment , and glad to have done so, mainly because I really hadn t thought about gluttony in any depth before Lots of great historical, religiuos, and artistic references to pursue later particularly the paintings Loved the citations to MFk Fisher as a counter voice.Prose is a marvelous writer haven t read much by her, but will be on the look out for .And funny, I was just yesterday trying to parse out gourmand versus g Quickly skimmed waiting at dentist s office a long, double appointment , and glad to have done so, mainly because I really hadn t thought about gluttony in any depth before Lots of great historical, religiuos, and artistic references to pursue later particularly the paintings Loved the citations to MFk Fisher as a counter voice.Prose is a marvelous writer haven t read much by her, but will be on the look out for .And funny, I was just yesterday trying to parse out gourmand versus gourmet The word glutton never crossed my mind Itvis a fine word A compilation of literary texts from the Bible and Classic Literature to Augustine and Aquinas and the Church Fathers to Fielding and the 20th Century science as well as interpretations of Fine Art, Prose reports and presents although she writes well, sadly, she offers few insights into the malady we now call obesity. Beautifully written exploration of how gluttony manifests and is discussed in historical religious and modern societal realms Forced me to question what modern perception of the glutton means for the values that members of society like myself hold Several dense excerpts could have been trimmed and better embedded into Prose s writing I would have likeddiscussion about gluttony in the form of drink in Prose s discussion of the compulsive forces at play in gluttony touching on alcoholi Beautifully written exploration of how gluttony manifests and is discussed in historical religious and modern societal realms Forced me to question what modern perception of the glutton means for the values that members of society like myself hold Several dense excerpts could have been trimmed and better embedded into Prose s writing I would have likeddiscussion about gluttony in the form of drink in Prose s discussion of the compulsive forces at play in gluttony touching on alcoholism as an addiction and disease would have been interesting Francine Prose s Gluttony looks focuses on how the title sin feels both like particularly idiosyncratic anachronism or incredibly relevant Prose s primary concern is the tension between the way gluttony is viewed and morphed half admired secretly, half seen as the primary gateway to other sins, Prose traces the idea from its medieval incarnation to through the early modern period and the various depictions of glutton hells to our current obsession with weight loss and yet increasing girth A b Francine Prose s Gluttony looks focuses on how the title sin feels both like particularly idiosyncratic anachronism or incredibly relevant Prose s primary concern is the tension between the way gluttony is viewed and morphed half admired secretly, half seen as the primary gateway to other sins, Prose traces the idea from its medieval incarnation to through the early modern period and the various depictions of glutton hells to our current obsession with weight loss and yet increasing girth A bit unfocused but there are nice gems of insight in it After spending much of the book on a chapter about early Christian views on the sin of gluttony, and some art works, she then jumps to modern day weight issues Obesity is not gluttony, so not sure why spend time on it in this slim volume Then some quick examples of gluttony and views on gluttony in the 20th C Issue with OUP as well read as an ebook, and the numerous footnotes in the text are not hyperlinked to the citations in the back of the book Luckily I found after 3 or 4 of them that After spending much of the book on a chapter about early Christian views on the sin of gluttony, and some art works, she then jumps to modern day weight issues Obesity is not gluttony, so not sure why spend time on it in this slim volume Then some quick examples of gluttony and views on gluttony in the 20th C Issue with OUP as well read as an ebook, and the numerous footnotes in the text are not hyperlinked to the citations in the back of the book Luckily I found after 3 or 4 of them that they weren t worth looking at citation only, no further information provided in the footnotes , and so not worth the clumsy effort to get back and forth between the text, the footnote and back to the text The bibliography feels like filler, as does the index, in a 128 pp book Also included in that are pages of illustrations, most of them not even discussed in the text do we really need a painting of St Augustine The Bosch and Bruegel, yes but not many of the others Grab a used copy if you come across one at a reasonable price, you can pretty much read this in one sitting This book is a brief account of the cultural history of the sin of gluttony According to the book there are historically two reasons that gluttony has been considered deadly First, gluttony can be seen as a form of idolatry in which worship of sensual pleasure replaces worship of God, and second, gluttony weakens our resolve, opening the door to lechery and debauchery It seems to me that on a deeper level, gluttony may perhaps be sinful because of the fraught nature of the relation between This book is a brief account of the cultural history of the sin of gluttony According to the book there are historically two reasons that gluttony has been considered deadly First, gluttony can be seen as a form of idolatry in which worship of sensual pleasure replaces worship of God, and second, gluttony weakens our resolve, opening the door to lechery and debauchery It seems to me that on a deeper level, gluttony may perhaps be sinful because of the fraught nature of the relation between the body and the spirit in Christianity If these two entities are opposed, then that which feeds the flesh starves the spirit and vice versa This great little book discusses the history and development of how society views the sin of gluttony It readslike an in depth article than a book, and certainly generates a lotquestions than answers, but I appreciated how Prose casts the acts of overeating and undereating in a historical, rather than merely nutritional, light.I bought this book solely because one of my favorite authors wrote it, but now I am curious about the rest of the collection Ugh, just what I don t need in m This great little book discusses the history and development of how society views the sin of gluttony It readslike an in depth article than a book, and certainly generates a lotquestions than answers, but I appreciated how Prose casts the acts of overeating and undereating in a historical, rather than merely nutritional, light.I bought this book solely because one of my favorite authors wrote it, but now I am curious about the rest of the collection Ugh, just what I don t need in my cramped apartment sixbooks "/>
  • Paperback
  • 108 pages
  • Gluttony
  • Francine Prose
  • English
  • 02 November 2018
  • 0195312058