Persons and Places

Persons and Places[KINDLE] ❥ Persons and Places ➛ George Santayana – Jobs-in-kingston.co.uk Philosopher, poet, critic of culture and literature, and best selling novelist, George Santayana stands as a major figure in American philosophy and literature This new edition of his autobiography Philosopher, poet, critic of culture and literature, and best selling novelist, George Santayana stands as a major figure in American philosophy and literature This new edition of Persons and PDF \ his autobiography restores passages that were deleted in the original book because of the publisher s sensitivities about lawsuits, printing and production convenience, a general desire by editors to soften some of his remarks, and his own request that portions be published only after his deathSantayana s marginal notes, idiosyncratic punctuation, and use of British spelling, reveal a stubbornly aloof and scrupulously remote observer The eloquence of this detachment is fully brought forth in the rich language and smoothly ironic recollections of Persons and Places William G Holzberger is Professor of English at Bucknell University Herman J Saatkamp, Jr is Professor and Head, Department of Philosophy and Humanities, Texas AM University. Santayana is wonderful an elitist, Latin, idiosyncratically Catholic crypto homosexual whose prose style makes me think of Gibbon cut with Yourcenar He belongs in Cyril Connolly s select pantheon, among the aphorists and philosophic poets who combine a sense of perfection and a faith in human dignity with a tragic apprehending of the human condition, and its nearness to the Abyss I love his writing because in it materialism and idealism, human limitation and human transcendence, appear i Santayana is wonderful an elitist, Latin, idiosyncratically Catholic crypto homosexual whose prose style makes me think of Gibbon cut with Yourcenar He belongs in Cyril Connolly s select pantheon, among the aphorists and philosophic poets who combine a sense of perfection and a faith in human dignity with a tragic apprehending of the human condition, and its nearness to the Abyss I love his writing because in it materialism and idealism, human limitation and human transcendence, appear in proportions I find congenial, sane, and frequently wise He seems to recall older meanings of philosopher that of the ancient polis Bertrand Russell attributed William James constitutional antipathy for his Harvard colleague Santayana to a democratic feeling that made James unable to acquiesce in the notion of one truth for the philosophers and another for the vulgar and that of the eighteenth century, as he exposes the material basis and conditions of our ideals and religions while always aware that ideals and religions, in various forms, are all we have are the flawed and falsified substance essence I don t know these terms of our being and are, finally, beautiful I should stop summarizing Santayana because I ve only read this, the first volume of his memoirs, and littlethanhalf of an abridgement of his four volume magnum opus, The Life of Reason enough, though, to sense the justice of former student Wallace Stevens elegy, To an Old Philosopher in Rome Impatient for the grandeur that you needIn so much misery and yet finding itOnly in misery, the afflatus of ruin,Profound poetry of the poor and the dead,As in the last drop of the deepest blood And Robert Lowell s tribute seems to capture Santayana s idiosyncratic aesthete s Catholicism free thinking Catholic infidel,stray spirit, who d found the Church too good to be believed.This review has become a tissue of quotations because it is the fate of neglected writers to cut a figure only in the still in print writings of their better remembered contemporaries, disciples and admirers I see that the 1944 first edition of Persons and Places that I read surprisingly sturdy or well preserved for a book issued under wartime rationing the Vatican helped the US State Department smuggle the manuscript out of Fascist Italy, where Santayana was living in a convent of Irish nuns saw the light shorn of many passages At Scribner s there was an editorial anxiety to soften some of Santayana s remarks, especially those about his prominent Bostonian relations Still, there was enough satirical sharpness left over to make the genealogical chapters unusually memorable And how did Jorge Agust n Nicol s Ruiz de Santayana y Borr s come to be a Bostonian His Spanish maternal grandfather took his mother to America in the 1820s They spent many years in Virginia Santayana noted his mother s Southern idiom of English, oh come step in for you may have this dance until Andrew Jackson appointed the grandfather American consul at Barcelona That office lapsed and grandfather took a posting with Spain s colonial service, and he and his now teenage daughter sailed for the Philippines, for Batang, an island on which they were the only Europeans, even the priest being native Grandfather soon took sick and died To support herself Mother became something of a merchant, convincing passing ships to transport the island s hemp harvet to Manila s market After a while a replacement governor arrived the man who would be Santayana s father But there was no island romance, no palm shaded tropical betrothal It was thought unseemly for an unchaperoned young lady to live alone alongside a man I guess the natives didn t count , and Mother immediately departed for Manila, where she met and married George Russell, a Boston merchant in the China trade and, interesting to me, one of Robert Gould Shaw s uncles She bore him three children He died in 1857 and she returned to Boston Visiting Spain a little later, she again met Santayana s father They married, and lived in Boston until the outbreak of the American Civil War, when she insisted on returning to Spain There Jorge George was born in 1864 Mother with the children retuned to Boston in 1869 her husband followed in 1872 but he disliked Boston and sailed back the same year Jorge George was raised in shabby gentility, in respectable but cheerless neighborhoods The book ends with his graduation from Harvard and embarkation for Germany.I like this passage Between the laughing and the weeping philosopher there is no opposition the same facts that make one laugh make one weep No whole hearted man, no sane art, can be limited to either mood In me this combination seems to be readier andpervasive than in most people I laugh a great deal, laugh too much, my friends tell me and those who don t understand me think that this merriment contradicts my disillusioned philosophy They, apparently, would never laugh if they admitted that life is a dream, that men are animated automata, and that the forms of the good and beautiful are as various and evanescent as the natural harmonies that produce them They think they would collapse or turn to stone, or despair and commit suicide But probably they would do no such thing they would adapt themselves to the reality, and laugh They might even feel a new zest in living, join in some bold adventure, become heroes, and think it glorious to die with a smile for the love of something beautiful They do not perceive that this is exactly what national leaders and religious martyrs have always done, except that their warm imagination has probably deceived them about the material effects of what they were doing.Telling me to read Mishima More than once in my life I have crossed a desert in all that regards myself, my thoughts, or my happiness so that when I look back over those years, I see objects, I see public events, I see persons and places , but I don t see myself.Santayana was an intensely private man He is aloofness personified, an exemplar of the wandering sage So when you read his works of philosophy, you get the feeling that there is something being hidden, like a card tucked up his sleeve Who was this man, so total More than once in my life I have crossed a desert in all that regards myself, my thoughts, or my happiness so that when I look back over those years, I see objects, I see public events, I see persons and places , but I don t see myself.Santayana was an intensely private man He is aloofness personified, an exemplar of the wandering sage So when you read his works of philosophy, you get the feeling that there is something being hidden, like a card tucked up his sleeve Who was this man, so totally unattached, and yet so connected to the intellectual life of his times How was someone like Santayana who sounds alternately like a prophet and an anachronism born into the same time as Bertrand Russell and William James Who was he These questions in mind, I quite naturally turned to his memoirs Perhaps here I would find the answer Alas, no for the privacy that characterizes his philosophical writing also makes itself apparent here, in his recollections This book is not a confession, nor is it even a narrative of his life It is, rather, as the title suggests, a series of portraits and vignettes from his memory It is an attempt to set down in writing some of the places and people who meant the most to him, and to evoke them, as best he can, for the reader I must admit that I was a bit disappointed in this When I read the memoirs of a thinker or a writer, I hope to find reflections on the development of his ideas, the beginnings of his interests, the techniques of his working life But this book is not one about ideas it is not even a book of anecdotes Ghastly are those autobiographies that contain nothing but old jokes and old anecdotes, he says, and launches into another description Instead of either ideas or adventures, instead of any coming of age story, we encounter Santayana s usual perfect calmness, his triumphant repose One gets the impression that Santayana was never excited or flustered in his life, so staid does he seem Of course, it s still an enjoyable read Santayana is always a strong writer, and the quality of his writing here far exceeds that in his novel, The Last Puritan Plus, it s simply fascinating seeing the world through his eyes For one, the details of his life were peculiar he had a unique upbringing, and he was teaching during the Golden Age of Harvard He met some of the brightest minds of his day, and traveled about America and Europe during and between the two world wars Yet these memoirs are perhapsvaluable for their perspective than their details Santayana doesn t philosophize in this book, but he has the perspective of a philosopher he looks on life with a calm some would say a cold gaze He was determined to live his life as he chose it, totally free and unaffiliated, seeing and thinking in private He may not have wanted to get too close to us, but at least he has given us this book THE Santayana s autobiography And it s GEORGE, by the way Because he was named after his mother s first husband, Bostonian George Sturgis The most interesting part of this book is at the beginning, where he maps out his family s origins An extremely interesting first 50 pages for me Who knew about Santayana s Philippine under Spain connection Granted, he never set foot here but considering his curiosity for history, he should have , but his parents met here So I don t forget Owing to THE Santayana s autobiography And it s GEORGE, by the way Because he was named after his mother s first husband, Bostonian George Sturgis The most interesting part of this book is at the beginning, where he maps out his family s origins An extremely interesting first 50 pages for me Who knew about Santayana s Philippine under Spain connection Granted, he never set foot here but considering his curiosity for history, he should have , but his parents met here So I don t forget Owing to his maternal grandfather s offer of a governorship in Batang Island nobody seems to know where this is, but it must be Batanes, since hemp figures in the story , his mother, an only child, and her father are stationed there The father soon dies, leaving his mother an orphan She stays on the island, and trades hemp to Manila Not soon after, a new governor takes her father s place as governor For propriety s sake, and because both his mother and the governor are the only white people in an island of Indians, his mother has to leave for Manila, to stay with friends In Manila she meets American George Sturgis and marries him and proceed to have five kids, of which only three survive to maturity Then Mr Sturgis meets an untimely death While visiting Spain, his mother meets his father Again The same fellow she had to leave Batang Island for Of course Santayana insists there would have been no sparks of passion between his parents, and he cannot account for the attraction,so their inclination to marry The second half of the book deals with his life in Boston and his first visit to the Avila of his childhood Since I haven t read The Last Puritan, I cannot really appreciate nor relate to the friends whom he intimates were his bases for the book s characters This book s success was second only to Gone With the Wind at the time of its release So it must been pretty mainstream reading Overall, this was not the intellectual epicure s book I thought it would be Santayana s musings on religion and faith, friendship and family, education and success these were all laid out in a most conversational manner Nothing verbose, if I managed to grasp most of it But he s sketchy with dates this he admits , and for someone who s always being quoted, this one had so few quotes that caught my fancy For this maybe I should look to his essays Como mucha gente en Espa a, descubri a Santayana a traves de Fernando Sabater Terrific

Persons and Places Epub Î Persons and  PDF \
    Persons and Places Epub Î Persons and PDF \ reveal a stubbornly aloof and scrupulously remote observer The eloquence of this detachment is fully brought forth in the rich language and smoothly ironic recollections of Persons and Places William G Holzberger is Professor of English at Bucknell University Herman J Saatkamp, Jr is Professor and Head, Department of Philosophy and Humanities, Texas AM University. Santayana is wonderful an elitist, Latin, idiosyncratically Catholic crypto homosexual whose prose style makes me think of Gibbon cut with Yourcenar He belongs in Cyril Connolly s select pantheon, among the aphorists and philosophic poets who combine a sense of perfection and a faith in human dignity with a tragic apprehending of the human condition, and its nearness to the Abyss I love his writing because in it materialism and idealism, human limitation and human transcendence, appear i Santayana is wonderful an elitist, Latin, idiosyncratically Catholic crypto homosexual whose prose style makes me think of Gibbon cut with Yourcenar He belongs in Cyril Connolly s select pantheon, among the aphorists and philosophic poets who combine a sense of perfection and a faith in human dignity with a tragic apprehending of the human condition, and its nearness to the Abyss I love his writing because in it materialism and idealism, human limitation and human transcendence, appear in proportions I find congenial, sane, and frequently wise He seems to recall older meanings of philosopher that of the ancient polis Bertrand Russell attributed William James constitutional antipathy for his Harvard colleague Santayana to a democratic feeling that made James unable to acquiesce in the notion of one truth for the philosophers and another for the vulgar and that of the eighteenth century, as he exposes the material basis and conditions of our ideals and religions while always aware that ideals and religions, in various forms, are all we have are the flawed and falsified substance essence I don t know these terms of our being and are, finally, beautiful I should stop summarizing Santayana because I ve only read this, the first volume of his memoirs, and littlethanhalf of an abridgement of his four volume magnum opus, The Life of Reason enough, though, to sense the justice of former student Wallace Stevens elegy, To an Old Philosopher in Rome Impatient for the grandeur that you needIn so much misery and yet finding itOnly in misery, the afflatus of ruin,Profound poetry of the poor and the dead,As in the last drop of the deepest blood And Robert Lowell s tribute seems to capture Santayana s idiosyncratic aesthete s Catholicism free thinking Catholic infidel,stray spirit, who d found the Church too good to be believed.This review has become a tissue of quotations because it is the fate of neglected writers to cut a figure only in the still in print writings of their better remembered contemporaries, disciples and admirers I see that the 1944 first edition of Persons and Places that I read surprisingly sturdy or well preserved for a book issued under wartime rationing the Vatican helped the US State Department smuggle the manuscript out of Fascist Italy, where Santayana was living in a convent of Irish nuns saw the light shorn of many passages At Scribner s there was an editorial anxiety to soften some of Santayana s remarks, especially those about his prominent Bostonian relations Still, there was enough satirical sharpness left over to make the genealogical chapters unusually memorable And how did Jorge Agust n Nicol s Ruiz de Santayana y Borr s come to be a Bostonian His Spanish maternal grandfather took his mother to America in the 1820s They spent many years in Virginia Santayana noted his mother s Southern idiom of English, oh come step in for you may have this dance until Andrew Jackson appointed the grandfather American consul at Barcelona That office lapsed and grandfather took a posting with Spain s colonial service, and he and his now teenage daughter sailed for the Philippines, for Batang, an island on which they were the only Europeans, even the priest being native Grandfather soon took sick and died To support herself Mother became something of a merchant, convincing passing ships to transport the island s hemp harvet to Manila s market After a while a replacement governor arrived the man who would be Santayana s father But there was no island romance, no palm shaded tropical betrothal It was thought unseemly for an unchaperoned young lady to live alone alongside a man I guess the natives didn t count , and Mother immediately departed for Manila, where she met and married George Russell, a Boston merchant in the China trade and, interesting to me, one of Robert Gould Shaw s uncles She bore him three children He died in 1857 and she returned to Boston Visiting Spain a little later, she again met Santayana s father They married, and lived in Boston until the outbreak of the American Civil War, when she insisted on returning to Spain There Jorge George was born in 1864 Mother with the children retuned to Boston in 1869 her husband followed in 1872 but he disliked Boston and sailed back the same year Jorge George was raised in shabby gentility, in respectable but cheerless neighborhoods The book ends with his graduation from Harvard and embarkation for Germany.I like this passage Between the laughing and the weeping philosopher there is no opposition the same facts that make one laugh make one weep No whole hearted man, no sane art, can be limited to either mood In me this combination seems to be readier andpervasive than in most people I laugh a great deal, laugh too much, my friends tell me and those who don t understand me think that this merriment contradicts my disillusioned philosophy They, apparently, would never laugh if they admitted that life is a dream, that men are animated automata, and that the forms of the good and beautiful are as various and evanescent as the natural harmonies that produce them They think they would collapse or turn to stone, or despair and commit suicide But probably they would do no such thing they would adapt themselves to the reality, and laugh They might even feel a new zest in living, join in some bold adventure, become heroes, and think it glorious to die with a smile for the love of something beautiful They do not perceive that this is exactly what national leaders and religious martyrs have always done, except that their warm imagination has probably deceived them about the material effects of what they were doing.Telling me to read Mishima More than once in my life I have crossed a desert in all that regards myself, my thoughts, or my happiness so that when I look back over those years, I see objects, I see public events, I see persons and places , but I don t see myself.Santayana was an intensely private man He is aloofness personified, an exemplar of the wandering sage So when you read his works of philosophy, you get the feeling that there is something being hidden, like a card tucked up his sleeve Who was this man, so total More than once in my life I have crossed a desert in all that regards myself, my thoughts, or my happiness so that when I look back over those years, I see objects, I see public events, I see persons and places , but I don t see myself.Santayana was an intensely private man He is aloofness personified, an exemplar of the wandering sage So when you read his works of philosophy, you get the feeling that there is something being hidden, like a card tucked up his sleeve Who was this man, so totally unattached, and yet so connected to the intellectual life of his times How was someone like Santayana who sounds alternately like a prophet and an anachronism born into the same time as Bertrand Russell and William James Who was he These questions in mind, I quite naturally turned to his memoirs Perhaps here I would find the answer Alas, no for the privacy that characterizes his philosophical writing also makes itself apparent here, in his recollections This book is not a confession, nor is it even a narrative of his life It is, rather, as the title suggests, a series of portraits and vignettes from his memory It is an attempt to set down in writing some of the places and people who meant the most to him, and to evoke them, as best he can, for the reader I must admit that I was a bit disappointed in this When I read the memoirs of a thinker or a writer, I hope to find reflections on the development of his ideas, the beginnings of his interests, the techniques of his working life But this book is not one about ideas it is not even a book of anecdotes Ghastly are those autobiographies that contain nothing but old jokes and old anecdotes, he says, and launches into another description Instead of either ideas or adventures, instead of any coming of age story, we encounter Santayana s usual perfect calmness, his triumphant repose One gets the impression that Santayana was never excited or flustered in his life, so staid does he seem Of course, it s still an enjoyable read Santayana is always a strong writer, and the quality of his writing here far exceeds that in his novel, The Last Puritan Plus, it s simply fascinating seeing the world through his eyes For one, the details of his life were peculiar he had a unique upbringing, and he was teaching during the Golden Age of Harvard He met some of the brightest minds of his day, and traveled about America and Europe during and between the two world wars Yet these memoirs are perhapsvaluable for their perspective than their details Santayana doesn t philosophize in this book, but he has the perspective of a philosopher he looks on life with a calm some would say a cold gaze He was determined to live his life as he chose it, totally free and unaffiliated, seeing and thinking in private He may not have wanted to get too close to us, but at least he has given us this book THE Santayana s autobiography And it s GEORGE, by the way Because he was named after his mother s first husband, Bostonian George Sturgis The most interesting part of this book is at the beginning, where he maps out his family s origins An extremely interesting first 50 pages for me Who knew about Santayana s Philippine under Spain connection Granted, he never set foot here but considering his curiosity for history, he should have , but his parents met here So I don t forget Owing to THE Santayana s autobiography And it s GEORGE, by the way Because he was named after his mother s first husband, Bostonian George Sturgis The most interesting part of this book is at the beginning, where he maps out his family s origins An extremely interesting first 50 pages for me Who knew about Santayana s Philippine under Spain connection Granted, he never set foot here but considering his curiosity for history, he should have , but his parents met here So I don t forget Owing to his maternal grandfather s offer of a governorship in Batang Island nobody seems to know where this is, but it must be Batanes, since hemp figures in the story , his mother, an only child, and her father are stationed there The father soon dies, leaving his mother an orphan She stays on the island, and trades hemp to Manila Not soon after, a new governor takes her father s place as governor For propriety s sake, and because both his mother and the governor are the only white people in an island of Indians, his mother has to leave for Manila, to stay with friends In Manila she meets American George Sturgis and marries him and proceed to have five kids, of which only three survive to maturity Then Mr Sturgis meets an untimely death While visiting Spain, his mother meets his father Again The same fellow she had to leave Batang Island for Of course Santayana insists there would have been no sparks of passion between his parents, and he cannot account for the attraction,so their inclination to marry The second half of the book deals with his life in Boston and his first visit to the Avila of his childhood Since I haven t read The Last Puritan, I cannot really appreciate nor relate to the friends whom he intimates were his bases for the book s characters This book s success was second only to Gone With the Wind at the time of its release So it must been pretty mainstream reading Overall, this was not the intellectual epicure s book I thought it would be Santayana s musings on religion and faith, friendship and family, education and success these were all laid out in a most conversational manner Nothing verbose, if I managed to grasp most of it But he s sketchy with dates this he admits , and for someone who s always being quoted, this one had so few quotes that caught my fancy For this maybe I should look to his essays Como mucha gente en Espa a, descubri a Santayana a traves de Fernando Sabater Terrific "/>
  • Paperback
  • 761 pages
  • Persons and Places
  • George Santayana
  • English
  • 08 June 2019
  • 0262691140