The Ocean Railway: Isambard Kingdom Brunel, Samuel Cunard and the Great Atlantic Steamships

The Ocean Railway: Isambard Kingdom Brunel, Samuel Cunard and the Great Atlantic Steamships❮PDF / Epub❯ ☆ The Ocean Railway: Isambard Kingdom Brunel, Samuel Cunard and the Great Atlantic Steamships ✪ Author Stephen Fox – Jobs-in-kingston.co.uk An epic social history of steamship travel from the th century to the Lusitania , the Mauretania and the Titanic The great transatlantic steamships became emblems of an age, of a Victorian audacity of An epic social Railway: Isambard Kindle Ò history of steamship travel from the th century to the Lusitania , the Mauretania and the Titanic The great transatlantic steamships became emblems of an age, of a Victorian audacity of spirit cathedrals to man s harnessing of new technology Through the innovations and designs of key engineers and shipping magnates Samuel Cunard, Isambard Kingdom The Ocean PDF/EPUB ² Brunel and Edward Knights Collins the largest movable objects in human history were created To the wealthy, steamships represented glamorous travel, but to most they offered cheap passage out of Europe to the New World At their peak, steamships delivered one million new Americans each year, transforming the world s oceans from barriers into highways In this fascinating history, Ocean Railway: Isambard PDF Ë Stephen Fox chronicles the tragedies that marked the evolution of the ocean liner, including thesinking of the Arctic , with the loss of three hundred and twenty two lives, and the early th century losses of the Lusitania and the Titanic Using contemporary records, diaries and writing, he penetrates the experience of transatlantic passage and examines the societies created on the vast floating cities, a kind of third human environment, neither land nor sea but partaking of each, and bridging them in unprecedented ways. I can t believe I haven t read this book before now Totally enjoyable and readable, Stephen Fox chronicles the dawn of transatlantic steam travel in the 19th century, the companies and men who built the ships and the rise of the technology that made it possible. Dense That is the word that comes to mind now that I have finished Stephen Fox s tome on the history of transatlantic shipping And I don t mean dense as in stupid I mean dense as in packed, stuffed, chock full of incredible information and astute detail.It is the thoroughness in this detail that makes this book an incredible reference source And a must have on the shelves of anyone interested in the history of transatlantic ocean liners I know I personally will consult this book again and a Dense That is the word that comes to mind now that I have finished Stephen Fox s tome on the history of transatlantic shipping And I don t mean dense as in stupid I mean dense as in packed, stuffed, chock full of incredible information and astute detail.It is the thoroughness in this detail that makes this book an incredible reference source And a must have on the shelves of anyone interested in the history of transatlantic ocean liners I know I personally will consult this book again and again as I start to tackle the many maritime related projects I have slated for myself But this thorough detail also has its drawback in many ways, this book is almost too intense for casual reading Maybe, as the passionate student of maritime history that I profess myself to be, I wanted to retainfrom my reading of this book than I quickly realized would be possible to do There is so much covered here so many names, dates, locations, technical jargons, and ship lifetimes that I found myself wanting to stop and create Excel spreadsheets to organize and collate Fox s data in a vain attempt to keep it all straight Maritime history nerd alert here I know many could sit back and read this book as casually as any other notable history But I rather foolishly wanted to be able to give a lecture on the topics covered in this work after a single reading How utterly, utterly foolish.The density of detail aside, there are snippets that will stand out to me I am an avid amateur student of maritime history and my two favorite topics are shipwrecks and people I am most fascinated by the personalities involved, life aboard ships, and the tragedy of ocean disasters There was plenty of all three in Fox s excellent narrative In fact, I was pleasantly surprised to find myself engrossed in some of theperipherary personalities, or characters Fox drops in here and there to illustrate certain key influences or experiences of transatlantic travel For example, the experiences of earlier transatlantic travelers like Fanny Appleton and Charles Dickens Or, evenso, the grudging acceptance and approval of late 19th century ocean liners by curmudgeonly American Henry Adams I found myself enjoying those stories most of all.But no matter the interest, be it the history of specific shipping companies everyone from Cunard to Collins to Hamburg America is here or the history of ship machinery or the social and political influences that drove some of the shipping decisions connection to the railroads, for example or the cultural relationships amongst the power players on the North Atlantic Great Britain and the United States, for example , Stephen Fox s Transatlantic has it covered It s a pretty good history of the development of the transatlantic steamships from the mid 19th century to around 1910.Let me get my rating out of the way 4 out of 5 stars Good, now I can nitpick What happened after 1910 Why end the story there When did airplane supplant steamships as the best way to cross the Atlantic What were the social and political impacts of the reduced time for transatlantic crossing Fox does have one chapter on that topic, but I find thatintriguing than all It s a pretty good history of the development of the transatlantic steamships from the mid 19th century to around 1910.Let me get my rating out of the way 4 out of 5 stars Good, now I can nitpick What happened after 1910 Why end the story there When did airplane supplant steamships as the best way to cross the Atlantic What were the social and political impacts of the reduced time for transatlantic crossing Fox does have one chapter on that topic, but I find thatintriguing than all the details about ship construction or heaven help us ship financing This is a very interesting and detailed book about the development of travel by steamship on the North Atlantic, providing a very clear picture with lots of first hand accounts of what it was like to travel by sea in those days, and how competition between different companies drove progress I did notice a few errors, however, like saying the early steam vessel Comet was named after the recent appearance of Halley s Comet which was last visible from Earth 53 years before the Comet was launc This is a very interesting and detailed book about the development of travel by steamship on the North Atlantic, providing a very clear picture with lots of first hand accounts of what it was like to travel by sea in those days, and how competition between different companies drove progress I did notice a few errors, however, like saying the early steam vessel Comet was named after the recent appearance of Halley s Comet which was last visible from Earth 53 years before the Comet was launched The conclusion, which skips to the Lusitania and Mauretania, also leaves a lot out I understand only mentioning the Titanic in passing there arethan enough books on that subject but White Star s second Oceanic and Big Four aren t mentioned at all, which feels strange given the overall themes of the book fascinating topic Indeed Stephen Fox has completely written a great book on the history of Transatlantic steamship travel from roughly the mid 19th century through 1910 I picked up this book for a mere.21 plus postage onand found it to be a surprisingly shiny gem It s hard to add to what my fellow reviewers have written below, other then I completely agree with them This is a dense book, packed with facts, figures, and exciting stories And yes, we unfortunately no longer have these grand Victorian li Indeed Stephen Fox has completely written a great book on the history of Transatlantic steamship travel from roughly the mid 19th century through 1910 I picked up this book for a mere.21 plus postage onand found it to be a surprisingly shiny gem It s hard to add to what my fellow reviewers have written below, other then I completely agree with them This is a dense book, packed with facts, figures, and exciting stories And yes, we unfortunately no longer have these grand Victorian liners to see and visit an utter shame , but Fox s keen descriptions bring them back to life for us Also, his stories about those that took the risks in building and financing these amazing machines is really nothing short of epic Those that designed and constructed these magnificent streamers throughout the ages were geniuses, and if they had been born a century later would have been maybe astronauts or the founders of Apple or Microsoft in our time Great men, all of them Stephen Fox is described as a freelance historian He writes about whatever seems to be his fancy whether sports, advertising, conservation, or even steamships But one thing is for sure, he tackles his subjects with such verve and enthusiasm it makes his readers excited and happy to go along on the ride with him I picked up this book mainly to learn about the German lines that took my Grandparents and other relatives over to America in 1913 I have family that came over on each of the German lines North German Lloyd and the Hamburg American lines I was quiet satisfied to learnabout their tumultuous journey and what they endured in reaching Ellis Island before the Great War For this I am grateful for Fox s work Only a few side notes I would have loved to see an appendix or timeline listing the boats and companies included in this book to perhaps complement what was spoken of in the text Also, a follow up book from 1911 1940 or so would be amazing Taking the rest of the story from the Golden Age of Transatlantic steam travel up to the advent of the great airlines that unfortunately do not exist any in anyway, shape, or form Please Mr Fox, work your magic onetime for us Lastly, although this book already covers miles of ground and ocean, we didn t get too much insight on the great Imperial Navies that also were born during this time as well Overall, I give Transatlantic a solid Five Stars an entertaining, witty, and fact filled text Ahoy Mr Fox, job well done Stephen Fox tells the story of steamship travel on the Atlantic Ocean, 1850 1915 Very interesting, particularly Fox s vivid descriptions of the horrible conditions people tolerated to cross the ocean on a steamer The second phase of the voyage began when the ship stopped hugging the shore and steamed out to seain the main saloon, waiters set out the table guards strips of wood three inches high arranged around the edges and across each place setting, to keep plates and glasses from sli Stephen Fox tells the story of steamship travel on the Atlantic Ocean, 1850 1915 Very interesting, particularly Fox s vivid descriptions of the horrible conditions people tolerated to cross the ocean on a steamer The second phase of the voyage began when the ship stopped hugging the shore and steamed out to seain the main saloon, waiters set out the table guards strips of wood three inches high arranged around the edges and across each place setting, to keep plates and glasses from sliding away The cabin stewards brought out side boards to hold people safely in their berths as they rolled back and forth 202.Yikes.Beautiful and historic photographs I enjoyed Stephen Fox s recreations of some of the human side of what could ve been another hull listing chronology.I was interested in how new fields of technology got established, such as the Naval Architects Institute It must have been daunting to work in a highly technical field in the early days of steam engines and yet, be considered a clever machinist NOTE I am currently rereading this to review the class system at play during the 1880 s thru the 1890 s, since my mother s family was I enjoyed Stephen Fox s recreations of some of the human side of what could ve been another hull listing chronology.I was interested in how new fields of technology got established, such as the Naval Architects Institute It must have been daunting to work in a highly technical field in the early days of steam engines and yet, be considered a clever machinist NOTE I am currently rereading this to review the class system at play during the 1880 s thru the 1890 s, since my mother s family was emigrating from Ireland and sending money back to bring over the rest of the adventurous members of the family The steerage descriptions got my imagination going.This book feeds my Effects of Techblogy on People and Vice Versa interest We take much for granted when we board a ship for a vacation cruise This book takes you through the age of the steamship from it s beginnings to the glory years of oceanic travel The cutthroat business end shows through but does nothing to tarnish the romance of the days when crossing the Atlantic in a luxury liner was the dream of a lifetime You get a great range of perspective from the ship owner, builder, first class pasenger and ship steward to the bloke booking a run in steerage Very in We take much for granted when we board a ship for a vacation cruise This book takes you through the age of the steamship from it s beginnings to the glory years of oceanic travel The cutthroat business end shows through but does nothing to tarnish the romance of the days when crossing the Atlantic in a luxury liner was the dream of a lifetime You get a great range of perspective from the ship owner, builder, first class pasenger and ship steward to the bloke booking a run in steerage Very informative Much detail but an easy read Many facts will find you running to google forbackground A good book to read while relaxing on a cruise Terrific, ticks all the boxes for me, history, transport, engineering etc.Well written and exhaustively researched held my attention almost all the way through except for some of chapter 14, Anglo Americans, which induced a hint of mild tedium, only a hint mind you.Why do publishers give a book one name in the USA and another in the UK Transatlantic should have sufficed for all editions in English but instead we have The Ocean Railway in the UK, perhaps it is a nod to Brunel and his Great Weste Terrific, ticks all the boxes for me, history, transport, engineering etc.Well written and exhaustively researched held my attention almost all the way through except for some of chapter 14, Anglo Americans, which induced a hint of mild tedium, only a hint mind you.Why do publishers give a book one name in the USA and another in the UK Transatlantic should have sufficed for all editions in English but instead we have The Ocean Railway in the UK, perhaps it is a nod to Brunel and his Great Western for a British public but it s not exactly a snappy title

The Ocean Railway: Isambard Kingdom Brunel, Samuel Cunard
    EPUB is an ebook file format that uses the epub thesinking of the Arctic , with the loss of three hundred and twenty two lives, and the early th century losses of the Lusitania and the Titanic Using contemporary records, diaries and writing, he penetrates the experience of transatlantic passage and examines the societies created on the vast floating cities, a kind of third human environment, neither land nor sea but partaking of each, and bridging them in unprecedented ways. I can t believe I haven t read this book before now Totally enjoyable and readable, Stephen Fox chronicles the dawn of transatlantic steam travel in the 19th century, the companies and men who built the ships and the rise of the technology that made it possible. Dense That is the word that comes to mind now that I have finished Stephen Fox s tome on the history of transatlantic shipping And I don t mean dense as in stupid I mean dense as in packed, stuffed, chock full of incredible information and astute detail.It is the thoroughness in this detail that makes this book an incredible reference source And a must have on the shelves of anyone interested in the history of transatlantic ocean liners I know I personally will consult this book again and a Dense That is the word that comes to mind now that I have finished Stephen Fox s tome on the history of transatlantic shipping And I don t mean dense as in stupid I mean dense as in packed, stuffed, chock full of incredible information and astute detail.It is the thoroughness in this detail that makes this book an incredible reference source And a must have on the shelves of anyone interested in the history of transatlantic ocean liners I know I personally will consult this book again and again as I start to tackle the many maritime related projects I have slated for myself But this thorough detail also has its drawback in many ways, this book is almost too intense for casual reading Maybe, as the passionate student of maritime history that I profess myself to be, I wanted to retainfrom my reading of this book than I quickly realized would be possible to do There is so much covered here so many names, dates, locations, technical jargons, and ship lifetimes that I found myself wanting to stop and create Excel spreadsheets to organize and collate Fox s data in a vain attempt to keep it all straight Maritime history nerd alert here I know many could sit back and read this book as casually as any other notable history But I rather foolishly wanted to be able to give a lecture on the topics covered in this work after a single reading How utterly, utterly foolish.The density of detail aside, there are snippets that will stand out to me I am an avid amateur student of maritime history and my two favorite topics are shipwrecks and people I am most fascinated by the personalities involved, life aboard ships, and the tragedy of ocean disasters There was plenty of all three in Fox s excellent narrative In fact, I was pleasantly surprised to find myself engrossed in some of theperipherary personalities, or characters Fox drops in here and there to illustrate certain key influences or experiences of transatlantic travel For example, the experiences of earlier transatlantic travelers like Fanny Appleton and Charles Dickens Or, evenso, the grudging acceptance and approval of late 19th century ocean liners by curmudgeonly American Henry Adams I found myself enjoying those stories most of all.But no matter the interest, be it the history of specific shipping companies everyone from Cunard to Collins to Hamburg America is here or the history of ship machinery or the social and political influences that drove some of the shipping decisions connection to the railroads, for example or the cultural relationships amongst the power players on the North Atlantic Great Britain and the United States, for example , Stephen Fox s Transatlantic has it covered It s a pretty good history of the development of the transatlantic steamships from the mid 19th century to around 1910.Let me get my rating out of the way 4 out of 5 stars Good, now I can nitpick What happened after 1910 Why end the story there When did airplane supplant steamships as the best way to cross the Atlantic What were the social and political impacts of the reduced time for transatlantic crossing Fox does have one chapter on that topic, but I find thatintriguing than all It s a pretty good history of the development of the transatlantic steamships from the mid 19th century to around 1910.Let me get my rating out of the way 4 out of 5 stars Good, now I can nitpick What happened after 1910 Why end the story there When did airplane supplant steamships as the best way to cross the Atlantic What were the social and political impacts of the reduced time for transatlantic crossing Fox does have one chapter on that topic, but I find thatintriguing than all the details about ship construction or heaven help us ship financing This is a very interesting and detailed book about the development of travel by steamship on the North Atlantic, providing a very clear picture with lots of first hand accounts of what it was like to travel by sea in those days, and how competition between different companies drove progress I did notice a few errors, however, like saying the early steam vessel Comet was named after the recent appearance of Halley s Comet which was last visible from Earth 53 years before the Comet was launc This is a very interesting and detailed book about the development of travel by steamship on the North Atlantic, providing a very clear picture with lots of first hand accounts of what it was like to travel by sea in those days, and how competition between different companies drove progress I did notice a few errors, however, like saying the early steam vessel Comet was named after the recent appearance of Halley s Comet which was last visible from Earth 53 years before the Comet was launched The conclusion, which skips to the Lusitania and Mauretania, also leaves a lot out I understand only mentioning the Titanic in passing there arethan enough books on that subject but White Star s second Oceanic and Big Four aren t mentioned at all, which feels strange given the overall themes of the book fascinating topic Indeed Stephen Fox has completely written a great book on the history of Transatlantic steamship travel from roughly the mid 19th century through 1910 I picked up this book for a mere.21 plus postage onand found it to be a surprisingly shiny gem It s hard to add to what my fellow reviewers have written below, other then I completely agree with them This is a dense book, packed with facts, figures, and exciting stories And yes, we unfortunately no longer have these grand Victorian li Indeed Stephen Fox has completely written a great book on the history of Transatlantic steamship travel from roughly the mid 19th century through 1910 I picked up this book for a mere.21 plus postage onand found it to be a surprisingly shiny gem It s hard to add to what my fellow reviewers have written below, other then I completely agree with them This is a dense book, packed with facts, figures, and exciting stories And yes, we unfortunately no longer have these grand Victorian liners to see and visit an utter shame , but Fox s keen descriptions bring them back to life for us Also, his stories about those that took the risks in building and financing these amazing machines is really nothing short of epic Those that designed and constructed these magnificent streamers throughout the ages were geniuses, and if they had been born a century later would have been maybe astronauts or the founders of Apple or Microsoft in our time Great men, all of them Stephen Fox is described as a freelance historian He writes about whatever seems to be his fancy whether sports, advertising, conservation, or even steamships But one thing is for sure, he tackles his subjects with such verve and enthusiasm it makes his readers excited and happy to go along on the ride with him I picked up this book mainly to learn about the German lines that took my Grandparents and other relatives over to America in 1913 I have family that came over on each of the German lines North German Lloyd and the Hamburg American lines I was quiet satisfied to learnabout their tumultuous journey and what they endured in reaching Ellis Island before the Great War For this I am grateful for Fox s work Only a few side notes I would have loved to see an appendix or timeline listing the boats and companies included in this book to perhaps complement what was spoken of in the text Also, a follow up book from 1911 1940 or so would be amazing Taking the rest of the story from the Golden Age of Transatlantic steam travel up to the advent of the great airlines that unfortunately do not exist any in anyway, shape, or form Please Mr Fox, work your magic onetime for us Lastly, although this book already covers miles of ground and ocean, we didn t get too much insight on the great Imperial Navies that also were born during this time as well Overall, I give Transatlantic a solid Five Stars an entertaining, witty, and fact filled text Ahoy Mr Fox, job well done Stephen Fox tells the story of steamship travel on the Atlantic Ocean, 1850 1915 Very interesting, particularly Fox s vivid descriptions of the horrible conditions people tolerated to cross the ocean on a steamer The second phase of the voyage began when the ship stopped hugging the shore and steamed out to seain the main saloon, waiters set out the table guards strips of wood three inches high arranged around the edges and across each place setting, to keep plates and glasses from sli Stephen Fox tells the story of steamship travel on the Atlantic Ocean, 1850 1915 Very interesting, particularly Fox s vivid descriptions of the horrible conditions people tolerated to cross the ocean on a steamer The second phase of the voyage began when the ship stopped hugging the shore and steamed out to seain the main saloon, waiters set out the table guards strips of wood three inches high arranged around the edges and across each place setting, to keep plates and glasses from sliding away The cabin stewards brought out side boards to hold people safely in their berths as they rolled back and forth 202.Yikes.Beautiful and historic photographs I enjoyed Stephen Fox s recreations of some of the human side of what could ve been another hull listing chronology.I was interested in how new fields of technology got established, such as the Naval Architects Institute It must have been daunting to work in a highly technical field in the early days of steam engines and yet, be considered a clever machinist NOTE I am currently rereading this to review the class system at play during the 1880 s thru the 1890 s, since my mother s family was I enjoyed Stephen Fox s recreations of some of the human side of what could ve been another hull listing chronology.I was interested in how new fields of technology got established, such as the Naval Architects Institute It must have been daunting to work in a highly technical field in the early days of steam engines and yet, be considered a clever machinist NOTE I am currently rereading this to review the class system at play during the 1880 s thru the 1890 s, since my mother s family was emigrating from Ireland and sending money back to bring over the rest of the adventurous members of the family The steerage descriptions got my imagination going.This book feeds my Effects of Techblogy on People and Vice Versa interest We take much for granted when we board a ship for a vacation cruise This book takes you through the age of the steamship from it s beginnings to the glory years of oceanic travel The cutthroat business end shows through but does nothing to tarnish the romance of the days when crossing the Atlantic in a luxury liner was the dream of a lifetime You get a great range of perspective from the ship owner, builder, first class pasenger and ship steward to the bloke booking a run in steerage Very in We take much for granted when we board a ship for a vacation cruise This book takes you through the age of the steamship from it s beginnings to the glory years of oceanic travel The cutthroat business end shows through but does nothing to tarnish the romance of the days when crossing the Atlantic in a luxury liner was the dream of a lifetime You get a great range of perspective from the ship owner, builder, first class pasenger and ship steward to the bloke booking a run in steerage Very informative Much detail but an easy read Many facts will find you running to google forbackground A good book to read while relaxing on a cruise Terrific, ticks all the boxes for me, history, transport, engineering etc.Well written and exhaustively researched held my attention almost all the way through except for some of chapter 14, Anglo Americans, which induced a hint of mild tedium, only a hint mind you.Why do publishers give a book one name in the USA and another in the UK Transatlantic should have sufficed for all editions in English but instead we have The Ocean Railway in the UK, perhaps it is a nod to Brunel and his Great Weste Terrific, ticks all the boxes for me, history, transport, engineering etc.Well written and exhaustively researched held my attention almost all the way through except for some of chapter 14, Anglo Americans, which induced a hint of mild tedium, only a hint mind you.Why do publishers give a book one name in the USA and another in the UK Transatlantic should have sufficed for all editions in English but instead we have The Ocean Railway in the UK, perhaps it is a nod to Brunel and his Great Western for a British public but it s not exactly a snappy title "/>
  • Hardcover
  • 493 pages
  • The Ocean Railway: Isambard Kingdom Brunel, Samuel Cunard and the Great Atlantic Steamships
  • Stephen Fox
  • English
  • 10 April 2017
  • 0002571854