The Dixon Cornbelt League and Other Baseball Stories

The Dixon Cornbelt League and Other Baseball Stories➵ The Dixon Cornbelt League and Other Baseball Stories Read ➼ Author W.P. Kinsella – Jobs-in-kingston.co.uk Shortstops who run with the wolves, painted eggs that reveal deeply disturbing meanings, long dead Hall of Famers who miraculously return to the game, an Iowa minor league town with a secret conspirac Cornbelt League PDF/EPUB Â Shortstops who run with the wolves, painted eggs that reveal deeply disturbing meanings, long dead Hall of Famers The Dixon PDF \ who miraculously return to the game, an Iowa minor league town with a secret conspiracy these are the elements Dixon Cornbelt League PDF ✓ from which W P Kinsella weaves nine fabulous stories about the magical world of baseball From the dugouts, clubhouses, bedrooms, and barrooms to the interior worlds of hope and despair, these eerie stories present the absurdities of human relationships and reveal the writer s special genius for touching the heart. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here W.P Kinsella is best known for his novel Shoeless Joe, which was made into the mega hit film, Field of Dreams Kinsella takes the field again in this impressive collection of baseball short stories In a Caribbean outback, a player routinely transforms into a wolf, and continues to play No one bats an eye In The Fadeaway, an aging hurler conjures up Christy Mathewson, who teaches him how to throw a screwball But the player never gets to try it out, and is doomed to fade away anyway In The D W.P Kinsella is best known for his novel Shoeless Joe, which was made into the mega hit film, Field of Dreams Kinsella takes the field again in this impressive collection of baseball short stories In a Caribbean outback, a player routinely transforms into a wolf, and continues to play No one bats an eye In The Fadeaway, an aging hurler conjures up Christy Mathewson, who teaches him how to throw a screwball But the player never gets to try it out, and is doomed to fade away anyway In The Darkness Deep Inside, a violent player finds Jesus and confronts a whole new set of problems In Eggs a player tries to hang on while his Russian wife makes traditional nesting eggs in their Canadian home In How Manny Embarquadero Overcame and Began His Climb to The Bigs, a city boy scams the game, pretending to be mute, and works his way up from the Latin American Leagues on the basis of his unusualness In Searching For January, Roberto Clemente emerges from the fog and sea fifteen years later, and is surprised to learn that he is dead In Feet of Clay, Mike Wheeler is determined to be in the best possible shape for old timers games What he does not realize is that the fans want to see old timers get old Lumpy Drobot, Designated Hitter manages to take a manager s suggestion that he takehits for the team to the point where one is absorbed into his skin In the title piece a non draftee is made an offer by a team in the Midwest It turns out that he, and the other players on the team were scouted as those who choke under pressure, and thus were unlikely to make in pro ball anyway They townsfolk are really trying to keep small town America alive by bringing in some fresh blood, something to counter the population loss of the genre They go out of their way to be nice to the players and to get them set up with work, girl friends, a nice life The protagonist, once he discovers the scam has to make a decision, to stay or go This is a warm, interesting collection I suppose Clemente will always be alive and at the age he was at his death I suppose the time comes to fade away for us all, and who could help but admire the enterprise of the mute Latin ballplayer Nice stuff, with content enough mixed in with style Not a must read, but I am glad I did For the baseball fan, as Doris Kearns Goodwin recently noted, baseball is a series of stories.Our North American counterpart to the magical realism of Borges, Asturrias, Garro, Robles and Garcia M rquez, may be W P Kinsella What I am sure of is that his stories of baseball resonate deeper in me than any other author.If you saw and enjoyed the movie, Field of Dreams or read the book that it was made from, Shoeless Joe, you will enjoy these vignettes My favorites The elegiac, Dixon Cornbelt Le For the baseball fan, as Doris Kearns Goodwin recently noted, baseball is a series of stories.Our North American counterpart to the magical realism of Borges, Asturrias, Garro, Robles and Garcia M rquez, may be W P Kinsella What I am sure of is that his stories of baseball resonate deeper in me than any other author.If you saw and enjoyed the movie, Field of Dreams or read the book that it was made from, Shoeless Joe, you will enjoy these vignettes My favorites The elegiac, Dixon Cornbelt League The profane and magical, The Fadeaway and, maybe,Feet of Clay about how little we can make the future conform to our fantasies I can t be mad at people who mean well, who know me better than I know myself A friend once observed to me that there s ultimately no difference between a taco, a burrito, a tostada, or any number of other Mexican dishes They re all the same ingredients, in slightly different proportions My answer then, as now, was that it didn t especially matter they all tasted good in any case.I think that general principle may apply to Kinsella as well You know what you re going to get almost every time baseball, some fantastic element, and a character confused by the speed of mo A friend once observed to me that there s ultimately no difference between a taco, a burrito, a tostada, or any number of other Mexican dishes They re all the same ingredients, in slightly different proportions My answer then, as now, was that it didn t especially matter they all tasted good in any case.I think that general principle may apply to Kinsella as well You know what you re going to get almost every time baseball, some fantastic element, and a character confused by the speed of modern life I enjoyed The Iowa Baseball Confederation and Shoeless Joe as much as anyone back in the day, and it s like slipping into a Mexican restaurant to come back to him in reading these stories It s familiar and, even if it doesn t seem special next to his better work, it still tastes good.That s a bottom line assessment I found two thirds of these nine stories to be pleasant enough, ones I read, enjoyed and turned the page on As I reflect on reading them just a few days ago, I have to cheat to look at the table of contents to be reminded of them.That said, there are three that have stuck with me, and I don t have to refresh my memory on them They re the kind that linger a while They are, in an easy metaphor that seems appropriate for Kinsella, solid hits.The first one in the collection, The Baseball Wolf, tells the story of a ballplayer in an imaginary country sandwiched between Haiti and the Dominican Republic who develops the capacity to become a wolf It s a variation on the werewolf story in that he wants the power Our narrator discovers there s nothing off about the transformation It s a fulfillment rather than a curse And it helps the guy play baseball as well There s something about it, though, that s gripping and inspiring.One of the later ones, Searching for January, isa single scene than a narrative, but it has a strange beauty to it A man wandering the beach is startled to see Roberto Clemente come ashore in a raft It s been 15 years since Clemente s plane crashed, but the Hall of Famer thinks no time has passed at all He s back, and he wants to play for the Pirates again When the narrator explains that it s 1987, Clemente decides he d rather go back into the mist, back to where he might be able to find his own time.Kinsella makes us do most of the heavy lifting ourselves which is a good thing in a story but I take it to mean that Clemente the character has come to understand that he is wedded to his own time He might survive as a figure in a transformed world, but he meant something particular when he risked his life in 1972 to carry supplies to earthquake ravaged Nicaragua He would necessarily mean something else in 1987, something diminished, so he resolves to seek his own past rather than live someone else s present.I admire the story for the way it suggests the power of a baseball player to represent somethingthan himself It insists on the potential of a surpassing player to be a metaphor for his team, his moment, and even his culture Clemente excelled at all that in 1972, and he won t settle for the shadow of it in 1987.The best of these, though, is the last one, the title story In it, our narrator is a college player who, drafted highly as a junior, has a lousy senior year When no one drafts him, his agent finds him a spot in a tiny independent league no one seems ever to have heard of.Everything is idyllic, almost too much so For a moment I was irritated by Kinsella s saccharine description, but I forgave him when the truth emerged There is, in fact, no league The small town has a team, but it plays only scrimmages against itself It exists to help populate the small town which is hemorrhaging its youth The team draws new citizens who, finding the place appealing, marry local girls and stay.What s evencompelling, though, is the way the community conducts its scouting It looks for players with real skill who come slowly to recognize that they choke, that they don t deliver when the pressure rises There s nothing wrong with such people In fact, when they relax and accept that about themselves when they realize they d be happier in small town Iowa than in a big league city they have the opportunity for a happiness that seems otherwise impossible in late 20th Century America.I got my 11 year old son to read this, and he characterized it as asking, What do you lovethe game or the games That is, do you prefer the idea of the game, the possibility you feel every time you pull on your glove or put on your cleats, or do you prefer the actual competition where, in ways beneath that Platonic ideal, you scrap to do your best and win the game It s a great question, but it s evenprovocative because Kinsella s answer the answer that s built into the story from its premise becomes the foundation for a whole community, for a whole way of life The people of the community use baseball to build their town, and then they use the town to build baseball Each institution is a dream the town and the team and each functions to make the other real.It s Kinsella at his best, as I see it, and that means something awful good to chew on I read this one as part of my mission to find material for the class my friend Will and I are team teaching, and I think this final short story and maybe the Clemente one as well is the first sure thing I ve come across for what we re doing Kinsella deftly and most pleasurably combines three fine things baseball, magical realism, and the short story Weaving baseball into stories from Canada to an imaginary Caribbean country, from unaffiliated leagues through the minors to The Show, Kinsella does short story magic The nine short stories all contain acts or hints of magical realism like events and most feature superbly created human main characters, most of whom play baseball at one level or another Those are delightfully combine Kinsella deftly and most pleasurably combines three fine things baseball, magical realism, and the short story Weaving baseball into stories from Canada to an imaginary Caribbean country, from unaffiliated leagues through the minors to The Show, Kinsella does short story magic The nine short stories all contain acts or hints of magical realism like events and most feature superbly created human main characters, most of whom play baseball at one level or another Those are delightfully combined to make short stories, many of which conclude in that short story treasure, the ambiguity of resolution, that shows so very much respect for the reader s ability and thought Truth be told, I thought there was a clunker among the nine stores, but only one which I will refrain from identifying surrounded by eight gems The writing is so smooth, so easy to follow and digest and enjoy, that this collection manages to balance ease of reading with thought provoking creation Do you have to know baseball to love this In my opinion, it helps, but no Kinsella s baseball stories are magical, even the ones with no supernatural element This book is about 50 50 supernatural realistic, and I enjoyed it all Some of the stories in this volume could be made into movies as touching and classic as Field of Dreams.Although I loved every page, it took me about a month to finish because I didn t want it to be over There are only so many Kinsella baseball stories, and I m burning through them. I read this many, many years ago and gave it another whirl for a few hours on a recent lazy winter weekend.Easy read Very enjoyable.Quite often I get thoroughly disappointed by a book of short stories But I rather enjoyed this one.Many of the stories had a high level of mystery, reminding me of a cross between a Twilight Zone episode and baseball. Not as good as the other books by Kinsella that I ve read Most of the stories are just ok the best one is the last one which is also called The Dixon Cornbelt League which features the themes of the religion of Iowa and baseball. On and off collection of dreamy baseball stories. Read it when I was a kid and loved it, especially the one about Roberto Clemente. Great read

The Dixon Cornbelt League and Other Baseball Stories
    The Dixon Cornbelt League and Other Baseball Stories bedrooms, and barrooms to the interior worlds of hope and despair, these eerie stories present the absurdities of human relationships and reveal the writer s special genius for touching the heart. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here W.P Kinsella is best known for his novel Shoeless Joe, which was made into the mega hit film, Field of Dreams Kinsella takes the field again in this impressive collection of baseball short stories In a Caribbean outback, a player routinely transforms into a wolf, and continues to play No one bats an eye In The Fadeaway, an aging hurler conjures up Christy Mathewson, who teaches him how to throw a screwball But the player never gets to try it out, and is doomed to fade away anyway In The D W.P Kinsella is best known for his novel Shoeless Joe, which was made into the mega hit film, Field of Dreams Kinsella takes the field again in this impressive collection of baseball short stories In a Caribbean outback, a player routinely transforms into a wolf, and continues to play No one bats an eye In The Fadeaway, an aging hurler conjures up Christy Mathewson, who teaches him how to throw a screwball But the player never gets to try it out, and is doomed to fade away anyway In The Darkness Deep Inside, a violent player finds Jesus and confronts a whole new set of problems In Eggs a player tries to hang on while his Russian wife makes traditional nesting eggs in their Canadian home In How Manny Embarquadero Overcame and Began His Climb to The Bigs, a city boy scams the game, pretending to be mute, and works his way up from the Latin American Leagues on the basis of his unusualness In Searching For January, Roberto Clemente emerges from the fog and sea fifteen years later, and is surprised to learn that he is dead In Feet of Clay, Mike Wheeler is determined to be in the best possible shape for old timers games What he does not realize is that the fans want to see old timers get old Lumpy Drobot, Designated Hitter manages to take a manager s suggestion that he takehits for the team to the point where one is absorbed into his skin In the title piece a non draftee is made an offer by a team in the Midwest It turns out that he, and the other players on the team were scouted as those who choke under pressure, and thus were unlikely to make in pro ball anyway They townsfolk are really trying to keep small town America alive by bringing in some fresh blood, something to counter the population loss of the genre They go out of their way to be nice to the players and to get them set up with work, girl friends, a nice life The protagonist, once he discovers the scam has to make a decision, to stay or go This is a warm, interesting collection I suppose Clemente will always be alive and at the age he was at his death I suppose the time comes to fade away for us all, and who could help but admire the enterprise of the mute Latin ballplayer Nice stuff, with content enough mixed in with style Not a must read, but I am glad I did For the baseball fan, as Doris Kearns Goodwin recently noted, baseball is a series of stories.Our North American counterpart to the magical realism of Borges, Asturrias, Garro, Robles and Garcia M rquez, may be W P Kinsella What I am sure of is that his stories of baseball resonate deeper in me than any other author.If you saw and enjoyed the movie, Field of Dreams or read the book that it was made from, Shoeless Joe, you will enjoy these vignettes My favorites The elegiac, Dixon Cornbelt Le For the baseball fan, as Doris Kearns Goodwin recently noted, baseball is a series of stories.Our North American counterpart to the magical realism of Borges, Asturrias, Garro, Robles and Garcia M rquez, may be W P Kinsella What I am sure of is that his stories of baseball resonate deeper in me than any other author.If you saw and enjoyed the movie, Field of Dreams or read the book that it was made from, Shoeless Joe, you will enjoy these vignettes My favorites The elegiac, Dixon Cornbelt League The profane and magical, The Fadeaway and, maybe,Feet of Clay about how little we can make the future conform to our fantasies I can t be mad at people who mean well, who know me better than I know myself A friend once observed to me that there s ultimately no difference between a taco, a burrito, a tostada, or any number of other Mexican dishes They re all the same ingredients, in slightly different proportions My answer then, as now, was that it didn t especially matter they all tasted good in any case.I think that general principle may apply to Kinsella as well You know what you re going to get almost every time baseball, some fantastic element, and a character confused by the speed of mo A friend once observed to me that there s ultimately no difference between a taco, a burrito, a tostada, or any number of other Mexican dishes They re all the same ingredients, in slightly different proportions My answer then, as now, was that it didn t especially matter they all tasted good in any case.I think that general principle may apply to Kinsella as well You know what you re going to get almost every time baseball, some fantastic element, and a character confused by the speed of modern life I enjoyed The Iowa Baseball Confederation and Shoeless Joe as much as anyone back in the day, and it s like slipping into a Mexican restaurant to come back to him in reading these stories It s familiar and, even if it doesn t seem special next to his better work, it still tastes good.That s a bottom line assessment I found two thirds of these nine stories to be pleasant enough, ones I read, enjoyed and turned the page on As I reflect on reading them just a few days ago, I have to cheat to look at the table of contents to be reminded of them.That said, there are three that have stuck with me, and I don t have to refresh my memory on them They re the kind that linger a while They are, in an easy metaphor that seems appropriate for Kinsella, solid hits.The first one in the collection, The Baseball Wolf, tells the story of a ballplayer in an imaginary country sandwiched between Haiti and the Dominican Republic who develops the capacity to become a wolf It s a variation on the werewolf story in that he wants the power Our narrator discovers there s nothing off about the transformation It s a fulfillment rather than a curse And it helps the guy play baseball as well There s something about it, though, that s gripping and inspiring.One of the later ones, Searching for January, isa single scene than a narrative, but it has a strange beauty to it A man wandering the beach is startled to see Roberto Clemente come ashore in a raft It s been 15 years since Clemente s plane crashed, but the Hall of Famer thinks no time has passed at all He s back, and he wants to play for the Pirates again When the narrator explains that it s 1987, Clemente decides he d rather go back into the mist, back to where he might be able to find his own time.Kinsella makes us do most of the heavy lifting ourselves which is a good thing in a story but I take it to mean that Clemente the character has come to understand that he is wedded to his own time He might survive as a figure in a transformed world, but he meant something particular when he risked his life in 1972 to carry supplies to earthquake ravaged Nicaragua He would necessarily mean something else in 1987, something diminished, so he resolves to seek his own past rather than live someone else s present.I admire the story for the way it suggests the power of a baseball player to represent somethingthan himself It insists on the potential of a surpassing player to be a metaphor for his team, his moment, and even his culture Clemente excelled at all that in 1972, and he won t settle for the shadow of it in 1987.The best of these, though, is the last one, the title story In it, our narrator is a college player who, drafted highly as a junior, has a lousy senior year When no one drafts him, his agent finds him a spot in a tiny independent league no one seems ever to have heard of.Everything is idyllic, almost too much so For a moment I was irritated by Kinsella s saccharine description, but I forgave him when the truth emerged There is, in fact, no league The small town has a team, but it plays only scrimmages against itself It exists to help populate the small town which is hemorrhaging its youth The team draws new citizens who, finding the place appealing, marry local girls and stay.What s evencompelling, though, is the way the community conducts its scouting It looks for players with real skill who come slowly to recognize that they choke, that they don t deliver when the pressure rises There s nothing wrong with such people In fact, when they relax and accept that about themselves when they realize they d be happier in small town Iowa than in a big league city they have the opportunity for a happiness that seems otherwise impossible in late 20th Century America.I got my 11 year old son to read this, and he characterized it as asking, What do you lovethe game or the games That is, do you prefer the idea of the game, the possibility you feel every time you pull on your glove or put on your cleats, or do you prefer the actual competition where, in ways beneath that Platonic ideal, you scrap to do your best and win the game It s a great question, but it s evenprovocative because Kinsella s answer the answer that s built into the story from its premise becomes the foundation for a whole community, for a whole way of life The people of the community use baseball to build their town, and then they use the town to build baseball Each institution is a dream the town and the team and each functions to make the other real.It s Kinsella at his best, as I see it, and that means something awful good to chew on I read this one as part of my mission to find material for the class my friend Will and I are team teaching, and I think this final short story and maybe the Clemente one as well is the first sure thing I ve come across for what we re doing Kinsella deftly and most pleasurably combines three fine things baseball, magical realism, and the short story Weaving baseball into stories from Canada to an imaginary Caribbean country, from unaffiliated leagues through the minors to The Show, Kinsella does short story magic The nine short stories all contain acts or hints of magical realism like events and most feature superbly created human main characters, most of whom play baseball at one level or another Those are delightfully combine Kinsella deftly and most pleasurably combines three fine things baseball, magical realism, and the short story Weaving baseball into stories from Canada to an imaginary Caribbean country, from unaffiliated leagues through the minors to The Show, Kinsella does short story magic The nine short stories all contain acts or hints of magical realism like events and most feature superbly created human main characters, most of whom play baseball at one level or another Those are delightfully combined to make short stories, many of which conclude in that short story treasure, the ambiguity of resolution, that shows so very much respect for the reader s ability and thought Truth be told, I thought there was a clunker among the nine stores, but only one which I will refrain from identifying surrounded by eight gems The writing is so smooth, so easy to follow and digest and enjoy, that this collection manages to balance ease of reading with thought provoking creation Do you have to know baseball to love this In my opinion, it helps, but no Kinsella s baseball stories are magical, even the ones with no supernatural element This book is about 50 50 supernatural realistic, and I enjoyed it all Some of the stories in this volume could be made into movies as touching and classic as Field of Dreams.Although I loved every page, it took me about a month to finish because I didn t want it to be over There are only so many Kinsella baseball stories, and I m burning through them. I read this many, many years ago and gave it another whirl for a few hours on a recent lazy winter weekend.Easy read Very enjoyable.Quite often I get thoroughly disappointed by a book of short stories But I rather enjoyed this one.Many of the stories had a high level of mystery, reminding me of a cross between a Twilight Zone episode and baseball. Not as good as the other books by Kinsella that I ve read Most of the stories are just ok the best one is the last one which is also called The Dixon Cornbelt League which features the themes of the religion of Iowa and baseball. On and off collection of dreamy baseball stories. Read it when I was a kid and loved it, especially the one about Roberto Clemente. Great read "/>
  • Paperback
  • 180 pages
  • The Dixon Cornbelt League and Other Baseball Stories
  • W.P. Kinsella
  • English
  • 09 August 2019
  • 0803278160