Pe Culmile Disperării

Pe Culmile Disperării[Download] ➼ Pe Culmile Disperării ➾ Emil M. Cioran – Jobs-in-kingston.co.uk Imagine walking across a tightrope suspended high in the summer air above a bay flooded in the mauve glow of sunset, the music of Beethoven s Ode to Joy surrounding you Now imagine the tightrope is ac Imagine walking across a tightrope suspended high in the summer air above a bay flooded in the mauve glow of sunset, the music of Beethoven s Ode Pe Culmile PDF \ to Joy surrounding you Now imagine the tightrope is actually razor wire, and gusts of wind challenge every tortuous step into sublime infinity This is the paradox of emotions one feels when reading On the Heights of Despair, the paradigmatic cry of the tortured artist whose explosive intensity of passion is equaled only by the profundity of his despair In this hauntingly lyrical meditation on darkness, stemming from a sustained insomniac hyper lucidity, E M Cioran cries out a devastating nihilism that is in the end betrayed by his own intransigent lust for being Compels reading and rereading. How does one become a pessimist By reading your book, pal You made Schopenhauer look like one of the Teletubbies It was a fortunate thing that I didn t read this during my impressionable adolescence I still can t rate it I think a 3 star rating is a good compromise Many quotes that pulled on my heartstrings, and many chapters I already forgot, out of immunity to certain thoughts and dislike of overly melodramatic prose Things that belong to the plane of ideas, naturally, since the kind of l How does one become a pessimist By reading your book, pal You made Schopenhauer look like one of the Teletubbies It was a fortunate thing that I didn t read this during my impressionable adolescence I still can t rate it I think a 3 star rating is a good compromise Many quotes that pulled on my heartstrings, and many chapters I already forgot, out of immunity to certain thoughts and dislike of overly melodramatic prose Things that belong to the plane of ideas, naturally, since the kind of life that has been portrayed at times is literally impossible, and impracticable ideas which try to convey intellectual depth and are repeated by others, clinging to such pose as hard as they can because happy people are all stupid and morality is a disgrace and I want to be consumed by fire and I long for the destruction of the world, too exhausting And I can t shake off a sense of artificiality True, if you read this, you re not much of an optimistic, but still I wholeheartedly agree with the third line of this review That being said, these few lines will be engulfed by the beauty of flames and will witness their own amoral destruction from which a proper review will absurdly blossom amid beautiful darkness echoing nothingness After restoring my soul with many reruns of Seinfeld.Feb 18, 17 Pre review Or final review if I forget I ll read The Trouble with Being Born anyway amature work, surely Also on my blog Not Walt Whitman But CloseThis fictional memoir sums up a young man s view of being old Being old means finally having to confront the end of oneself Cioran does this as a self professed therapeutic exercise His translator calls the book a prosesong of myself,thus connecting Cioran with Whitman Perhaps but could this bethan merely the sense that each is the opposite of the other Whitman finds his joy and inspiration in his good health Cioran revels in his physical suffering as Not Walt Whitman But CloseThis fictional memoir sums up a young man s view of being old Being old means finally having to confront the end of oneself Cioran does this as a self professed therapeutic exercise His translator calls the book a prosesong of myself,thus connecting Cioran with Whitman Perhaps but could this bethan merely the sense that each is the opposite of the other Whitman finds his joy and inspiration in his good health Cioran revels in his physical suffering as the source of artistic virtue Whitman is called by theurgeof the world Cioran feels the urge of death Whitman celebrates Cioran mourns Whitman looks forward to aluckyDeath Cioran wants us to give Death the fear it deserves Whitman saysI exist as I am, that is, enough Cioran says,We are so lonely in life that we must ask ourselves if the loneliness of dying is not a symbol of our human existence One could go on cataloguing the precise contradictions between the two Their views on their own lives and that of the world itself are so obviously antithetical that the list of correspondences quickly becomes boring Nonetheless there is this that makes them brothers the irresistible necessity to express their innermost, subjective selves Both feel they are exploding with something of universal significance What each perceives is simply too powerful to remain hidden What both provide, therefore, is a sort of phenomenology of the soul Not as a promotion or recommendation, but as a description In a way it is not the content of each exposition that is most important but the method of construction As Cioran says, this method is one of lyricism, that is, the attentive expression of emotions and other physical states No ideas, no arguments, no explanation, no theory So despite their radically different stances, Whitman and Cioran are actually similar examples of this lyrical method They certainly aren t philosophical positions from which to choose There is a reason why certain authors, regardless of their genius, are destined to remain relatively anonymous to the wider world Cioran is of this type Without any reluctance he talks about ideas and emotions that most people spend the major part of their lives trying their best to repress and ignore Some might consider this brazen, but to my mind I don t imagine he had a choice in the matter Some thoughts need out Some can t be resisted, like gravity And if you had such thoughts, ones yo There is a reason why certain authors, regardless of their genius, are destined to remain relatively anonymous to the wider world Cioran is of this type Without any reluctance he talks about ideas and emotions that most people spend the major part of their lives trying their best to repress and ignore Some might consider this brazen, but to my mind I don t imagine he had a choice in the matter Some thoughts need out Some can t be resisted, like gravity And if you had such thoughts, ones you knew were vital to your human condition, that keeping them in would result in total inner collapse, would you do anything but fling them into the arms of others, whether they were prepared to embrace them or not Humans just aren t very good by and large at contemplating death and the futility of the things they fill their days with Accepting what Cioran has to say is adverse to almost all intuition, even to people like me who wholly agrees with him But there is something comforting about what he has to say especially if you happen to be struck down by laziness much of the time If the meaninglessness of the world is justified, then don t condemn yourself for choosing to watch Jeremy Kyle when you know someone else is out there churning out works of art Both of these people entered the world accidentally Both will probably stumble out I never watch Jeremy Kyle I advise you do the same Eventually you will understand that intense work is the best you can do to keep your subjective mind content You ll realise that subjectivity is all you can go on, something which Cioran gets at very early in the book Before I d read this, I d formed some vague, unfinished idea which could only be shaped properly once Cioran had led the way the suffering of others is no alleviator to your own suffering Regardless of whether you are accompanied on this path of misery, or are even eclipsed in your torment by others, it is still no consolation and never can be because all you will ever know is your own thoughts and pain, your own subjectivity So basically, if I was going to Hell which I don t believe is going to happen, because I don t believe in such places , I wouldn t be comforted by the knowledge of the thousands of others coming with me Nobody can transfer their pain onto others At best I think this human illusion is noteworthy because it acts as a sort of mental morphine But it doesn t delete the fundamental problem, which we must learn to exist with There are parts of this book which seem a little obscure, a little melodramatic Not all is golden But to arrive at such conclusions at twenty one is astounding, and is a bench mark for anyone who wishes for precociousness In the end, I find it a little sad and pathetic that Cioran will never be read as much as he deserves to be He s too honest and blatant His readership will never fluctuate too dramatically because the majority of people will never be persuaded that his considerations are necessary ones except maybe on their deathbeds Ah, Cioran, twenty two years old and already so caustically weary with that great travail called life I remember that age well This is a compulsively readable shotgun blast of bleak lyricism that ofttimes offers profound insight and occasionally jejune invective Cioran is a cruel diagnostician of despair there is little from the realms of spiritual shadow that he is not acutely aware of and scourges the quotidian world with its infinite banality, pointlessness, and immanent subjugation to Ah, Cioran, twenty two years old and already so caustically weary with that great travail called life I remember that age well This is a compulsively readable shotgun blast of bleak lyricism that ofttimes offers profound insight and occasionally jejune invective Cioran is a cruel diagnostician of despair there is little from the realms of spiritual shadow that he is not acutely aware of and scourges the quotidian world with its infinite banality, pointlessness, and immanent subjugation to death However, despite perpetual imprisonment within the inky penumbra of a monstrous mortality this Romanian poet of lyrical lunacy a twentieth century Zarathustra reborn calls for man s effervescent and uninhibited embrace of all the thrilling ecstasies of irrationality grace, sublimity, joy, enthusiasm, eros a minstrel abandonment to a musical madness and inchoate freedom, a refusal to fully submit to a crippling subjectivism and a breaking of the straitening bonds of philosophical and moral systems, that will at least let one seize the pleasures of the moment and laugh at death, dance with infinity, sing for love, instead of crying and moaning in the throes of existential nausea and despondency There is as little aptitude towards suicide within the Transylvanian prophet as there is towards living he defiantly thrusts against the current in the belly of the abyss.The translation is solid and does justice to Cioran s reputation as a Romanian bard philosopher I filled around nine pages of a notebook with quotations from the work there are some truly memorable aphorisms and phrases that sear with a scalding wit and truth If there is a touch too much untamed, youthful overacting at points, it is a minor and forgivable excess in what is otherwise a delightfully dark jeremiad, a paean to pessimism and it limns what an agonizingly astute and lyrical mind the conventional life loathing decrier already possessed at a still tender age I knew when I set eyes on this book s title that I was going to love it It is so imperfectly perfect, so beautifully flawed, so darkly comforting for someone like me.There are many statements in On the Heights of Despair I don t agree with I found Cioran s take on women and on the difference between man and other living creatures to be too immature He is melodramatic and over exhilarated at times But he touches on subjects that interest me he thinks thoughts that I do He is endearingly bol I knew when I set eyes on this book s title that I was going to love it It is so imperfectly perfect, so beautifully flawed, so darkly comforting for someone like me.There are many statements in On the Heights of Despair I don t agree with I found Cioran s take on women and on the difference between man and other living creatures to be too immature He is melodramatic and over exhilarated at times But he touches on subjects that interest me he thinks thoughts that I do He is endearingly bold and passionate Spending time with this book felt like talking to someone who understands and accepts you the way you are I can t recall the last time I felt comfortable in my own skin without the compulsive need to explain that melancholy and sadness are not a result of things that happened to me in the past, but are just a pivotal part of my being, and have accompanied me since the day I was born.Although very intelligently and coherently written, one can tell that these are the words of a young soul There is narrow mindedness and self centeredness in Cioran s views There is lack of acceptance there is arrogance and there is na vet But just as na vely, my mind drank every word and slumbered into blissful inebriation An intangible thirst was quenched in me and I now lay here satisfied, yet alert I know the munchies will come back soon enough, but what a way to finish my reading year Before writing in French, this was philosopher Emil Cioran s first book published in Romania in 1934, when he was in his early 20s The short pieces essays that make up the book are full of great melancholy and bleakness, and it feels appropriate to read this when it s pitch black outside and pouring with rain, not on a nice summer s day In Romania in the 1960s and 1970s, Cioran was seen as a mysterious, almost mythological figure One would hear that such a person existed, but he became as inv Before writing in French, this was philosopher Emil Cioran s first book published in Romania in 1934, when he was in his early 20s The short pieces essays that make up the book are full of great melancholy and bleakness, and it feels appropriate to read this when it s pitch black outside and pouring with rain, not on a nice summer s day In Romania in the 1960s and 1970s, Cioran was seen as a mysterious, almost mythological figure One would hear that such a person existed, but he became as invisible as the wind, and his books were so hard to get hold of, after he had departed his homeland some ten years before WW2 On the Heights of Despair, brings together all the themes from his later work, like loneliness, disease, death, suffering, the dark abyss, anguish, nothingness and madness sorry to put a downer on things He writes wholey like a man who is afraid his time on earth is almost up and he hasn t got to say all the things that bludgeoned his soul While reading through his writings, you clearly see a tormented man, tormented by the sheer intensity of his feelings, you see him getting out of bed so early in the morning to pour his inner turmoil down on paper like a form of exorcism Although pessimism dominates the book, look hard enough, and there are traces of optimism too Writing for Cioran was a realise, a kind of treatment I guess, a treatment but certainly not a cure, a way to at least find small pockets of relief from his obsessions and agonies An interesting read It s a shame that this is Cioran s most rated book in Goodreads, since it s not his best one at all and he knew it Too much downmarket lyricism, too juvenile, and both the cheap lyricism and juvenality aren t as poetic as he would have liked them to be we have Rimbaud for that, though Cioran regreted this style in his adult books That being said 1 This book has a few terrific moments, like the aphorism on the sterility of traditional wisemen.2 It was Beckett s favourite, no matter ho It s a shame that this is Cioran s most rated book in Goodreads, since it s not his best one at all and he knew it Too much downmarket lyricism, too juvenile, and both the cheap lyricism and juvenality aren t as poetic as he would have liked them to be we have Rimbaud for that, though Cioran regreted this style in his adult books That being said 1 This book has a few terrific moments, like the aphorism on the sterility of traditional wisemen.2 It was Beckett s favourite, no matter how good were Cioran s follow ups, for its sheer emotional voltage In a sense, Cioran never wrote such a borderline suicidal book, which has its artistic especially for a philosopher value, after all We live in an age in which it is almost a sin to be unhappy, this book is a fine antidote to that stupidity. Like many other books, this one is anything but an escape It impugns reality and swirls it around with words like chaos, insomnia, love, death, suicide and the like This is one of the most provocative books I have ever read It is very hard to give a review on this dark, extensional author who is commonly known as the king of pessimists.This was the first book I read by Ciroan, the then 22 year old Cioran managed to keep me up till 5 in the morning with shivers There is always a serious da Like many other books, this one is anything but an escape It impugns reality and swirls it around with words like chaos, insomnia, love, death, suicide and the like This is one of the most provocative books I have ever read It is very hard to give a review on this dark, extensional author who is commonly known as the king of pessimists.This was the first book I read by Ciroan, the then 22 year old Cioran managed to keep me up till 5 in the morning with shivers There is always a serious danger in repressing something which requires objectification he mentions in the beginning of the book and this is exactly what he did He picked up topics we have shunned down somewhere deep inside our head because of the agony, confusion or dismay they would cause He embodied those words made them sound way grave than I expected and pieced me with every word He often asksquestions than he answers and they arethan enough to get your heart racing with feelings of caducity, fragility and emptiness Nothingness, lyricism, the absurd, the world and I Cioran probed the reality of existence The iterate use of statements that implied the simulacra of a life created by the world is nothing but an illusion He urged the way of solitude, restlessness, madness and the indirect animals we already are In spite of all this, it is so ironically life affirming and inspiring I will never be able to be the same after reading this book also I have read it nearly every night since Love your unhappiness and hate yourhappiness, mix everything up, scramble it all Be a snowflake dancing in the air, aflower floating downstream Have courage when you don t need to, and be a cowardwhen you must be brave Who knows You may still be a winner And if you lose,does it really matter Is there anything to win in this world All gain is a loss, and all loss is a gain Why always expect a definite stance, clear ideas, and meaningful words Ifeel as if I should spout fire in response to all the questions which were ever put, ornot put, to me

Pe Culmile Disperării Epub Ê Pe Culmile  PDF \
    EPUB is an ebook file format that uses the epub Heights of Despair, the paradigmatic cry of the tortured artist whose explosive intensity of passion is equaled only by the profundity of his despair In this hauntingly lyrical meditation on darkness, stemming from a sustained insomniac hyper lucidity, E M Cioran cries out a devastating nihilism that is in the end betrayed by his own intransigent lust for being Compels reading and rereading. How does one become a pessimist By reading your book, pal You made Schopenhauer look like one of the Teletubbies It was a fortunate thing that I didn t read this during my impressionable adolescence I still can t rate it I think a 3 star rating is a good compromise Many quotes that pulled on my heartstrings, and many chapters I already forgot, out of immunity to certain thoughts and dislike of overly melodramatic prose Things that belong to the plane of ideas, naturally, since the kind of l How does one become a pessimist By reading your book, pal You made Schopenhauer look like one of the Teletubbies It was a fortunate thing that I didn t read this during my impressionable adolescence I still can t rate it I think a 3 star rating is a good compromise Many quotes that pulled on my heartstrings, and many chapters I already forgot, out of immunity to certain thoughts and dislike of overly melodramatic prose Things that belong to the plane of ideas, naturally, since the kind of life that has been portrayed at times is literally impossible, and impracticable ideas which try to convey intellectual depth and are repeated by others, clinging to such pose as hard as they can because happy people are all stupid and morality is a disgrace and I want to be consumed by fire and I long for the destruction of the world, too exhausting And I can t shake off a sense of artificiality True, if you read this, you re not much of an optimistic, but still I wholeheartedly agree with the third line of this review That being said, these few lines will be engulfed by the beauty of flames and will witness their own amoral destruction from which a proper review will absurdly blossom amid beautiful darkness echoing nothingness After restoring my soul with many reruns of Seinfeld.Feb 18, 17 Pre review Or final review if I forget I ll read The Trouble with Being Born anyway amature work, surely Also on my blog Not Walt Whitman But CloseThis fictional memoir sums up a young man s view of being old Being old means finally having to confront the end of oneself Cioran does this as a self professed therapeutic exercise His translator calls the book a prosesong of myself,thus connecting Cioran with Whitman Perhaps but could this bethan merely the sense that each is the opposite of the other Whitman finds his joy and inspiration in his good health Cioran revels in his physical suffering as Not Walt Whitman But CloseThis fictional memoir sums up a young man s view of being old Being old means finally having to confront the end of oneself Cioran does this as a self professed therapeutic exercise His translator calls the book a prosesong of myself,thus connecting Cioran with Whitman Perhaps but could this bethan merely the sense that each is the opposite of the other Whitman finds his joy and inspiration in his good health Cioran revels in his physical suffering as the source of artistic virtue Whitman is called by theurgeof the world Cioran feels the urge of death Whitman celebrates Cioran mourns Whitman looks forward to aluckyDeath Cioran wants us to give Death the fear it deserves Whitman saysI exist as I am, that is, enough Cioran says,We are so lonely in life that we must ask ourselves if the loneliness of dying is not a symbol of our human existence One could go on cataloguing the precise contradictions between the two Their views on their own lives and that of the world itself are so obviously antithetical that the list of correspondences quickly becomes boring Nonetheless there is this that makes them brothers the irresistible necessity to express their innermost, subjective selves Both feel they are exploding with something of universal significance What each perceives is simply too powerful to remain hidden What both provide, therefore, is a sort of phenomenology of the soul Not as a promotion or recommendation, but as a description In a way it is not the content of each exposition that is most important but the method of construction As Cioran says, this method is one of lyricism, that is, the attentive expression of emotions and other physical states No ideas, no arguments, no explanation, no theory So despite their radically different stances, Whitman and Cioran are actually similar examples of this lyrical method They certainly aren t philosophical positions from which to choose There is a reason why certain authors, regardless of their genius, are destined to remain relatively anonymous to the wider world Cioran is of this type Without any reluctance he talks about ideas and emotions that most people spend the major part of their lives trying their best to repress and ignore Some might consider this brazen, but to my mind I don t imagine he had a choice in the matter Some thoughts need out Some can t be resisted, like gravity And if you had such thoughts, ones yo There is a reason why certain authors, regardless of their genius, are destined to remain relatively anonymous to the wider world Cioran is of this type Without any reluctance he talks about ideas and emotions that most people spend the major part of their lives trying their best to repress and ignore Some might consider this brazen, but to my mind I don t imagine he had a choice in the matter Some thoughts need out Some can t be resisted, like gravity And if you had such thoughts, ones you knew were vital to your human condition, that keeping them in would result in total inner collapse, would you do anything but fling them into the arms of others, whether they were prepared to embrace them or not Humans just aren t very good by and large at contemplating death and the futility of the things they fill their days with Accepting what Cioran has to say is adverse to almost all intuition, even to people like me who wholly agrees with him But there is something comforting about what he has to say especially if you happen to be struck down by laziness much of the time If the meaninglessness of the world is justified, then don t condemn yourself for choosing to watch Jeremy Kyle when you know someone else is out there churning out works of art Both of these people entered the world accidentally Both will probably stumble out I never watch Jeremy Kyle I advise you do the same Eventually you will understand that intense work is the best you can do to keep your subjective mind content You ll realise that subjectivity is all you can go on, something which Cioran gets at very early in the book Before I d read this, I d formed some vague, unfinished idea which could only be shaped properly once Cioran had led the way the suffering of others is no alleviator to your own suffering Regardless of whether you are accompanied on this path of misery, or are even eclipsed in your torment by others, it is still no consolation and never can be because all you will ever know is your own thoughts and pain, your own subjectivity So basically, if I was going to Hell which I don t believe is going to happen, because I don t believe in such places , I wouldn t be comforted by the knowledge of the thousands of others coming with me Nobody can transfer their pain onto others At best I think this human illusion is noteworthy because it acts as a sort of mental morphine But it doesn t delete the fundamental problem, which we must learn to exist with There are parts of this book which seem a little obscure, a little melodramatic Not all is golden But to arrive at such conclusions at twenty one is astounding, and is a bench mark for anyone who wishes for precociousness In the end, I find it a little sad and pathetic that Cioran will never be read as much as he deserves to be He s too honest and blatant His readership will never fluctuate too dramatically because the majority of people will never be persuaded that his considerations are necessary ones except maybe on their deathbeds Ah, Cioran, twenty two years old and already so caustically weary with that great travail called life I remember that age well This is a compulsively readable shotgun blast of bleak lyricism that ofttimes offers profound insight and occasionally jejune invective Cioran is a cruel diagnostician of despair there is little from the realms of spiritual shadow that he is not acutely aware of and scourges the quotidian world with its infinite banality, pointlessness, and immanent subjugation to Ah, Cioran, twenty two years old and already so caustically weary with that great travail called life I remember that age well This is a compulsively readable shotgun blast of bleak lyricism that ofttimes offers profound insight and occasionally jejune invective Cioran is a cruel diagnostician of despair there is little from the realms of spiritual shadow that he is not acutely aware of and scourges the quotidian world with its infinite banality, pointlessness, and immanent subjugation to death However, despite perpetual imprisonment within the inky penumbra of a monstrous mortality this Romanian poet of lyrical lunacy a twentieth century Zarathustra reborn calls for man s effervescent and uninhibited embrace of all the thrilling ecstasies of irrationality grace, sublimity, joy, enthusiasm, eros a minstrel abandonment to a musical madness and inchoate freedom, a refusal to fully submit to a crippling subjectivism and a breaking of the straitening bonds of philosophical and moral systems, that will at least let one seize the pleasures of the moment and laugh at death, dance with infinity, sing for love, instead of crying and moaning in the throes of existential nausea and despondency There is as little aptitude towards suicide within the Transylvanian prophet as there is towards living he defiantly thrusts against the current in the belly of the abyss.The translation is solid and does justice to Cioran s reputation as a Romanian bard philosopher I filled around nine pages of a notebook with quotations from the work there are some truly memorable aphorisms and phrases that sear with a scalding wit and truth If there is a touch too much untamed, youthful overacting at points, it is a minor and forgivable excess in what is otherwise a delightfully dark jeremiad, a paean to pessimism and it limns what an agonizingly astute and lyrical mind the conventional life loathing decrier already possessed at a still tender age I knew when I set eyes on this book s title that I was going to love it It is so imperfectly perfect, so beautifully flawed, so darkly comforting for someone like me.There are many statements in On the Heights of Despair I don t agree with I found Cioran s take on women and on the difference between man and other living creatures to be too immature He is melodramatic and over exhilarated at times But he touches on subjects that interest me he thinks thoughts that I do He is endearingly bol I knew when I set eyes on this book s title that I was going to love it It is so imperfectly perfect, so beautifully flawed, so darkly comforting for someone like me.There are many statements in On the Heights of Despair I don t agree with I found Cioran s take on women and on the difference between man and other living creatures to be too immature He is melodramatic and over exhilarated at times But he touches on subjects that interest me he thinks thoughts that I do He is endearingly bold and passionate Spending time with this book felt like talking to someone who understands and accepts you the way you are I can t recall the last time I felt comfortable in my own skin without the compulsive need to explain that melancholy and sadness are not a result of things that happened to me in the past, but are just a pivotal part of my being, and have accompanied me since the day I was born.Although very intelligently and coherently written, one can tell that these are the words of a young soul There is narrow mindedness and self centeredness in Cioran s views There is lack of acceptance there is arrogance and there is na vet But just as na vely, my mind drank every word and slumbered into blissful inebriation An intangible thirst was quenched in me and I now lay here satisfied, yet alert I know the munchies will come back soon enough, but what a way to finish my reading year Before writing in French, this was philosopher Emil Cioran s first book published in Romania in 1934, when he was in his early 20s The short pieces essays that make up the book are full of great melancholy and bleakness, and it feels appropriate to read this when it s pitch black outside and pouring with rain, not on a nice summer s day In Romania in the 1960s and 1970s, Cioran was seen as a mysterious, almost mythological figure One would hear that such a person existed, but he became as inv Before writing in French, this was philosopher Emil Cioran s first book published in Romania in 1934, when he was in his early 20s The short pieces essays that make up the book are full of great melancholy and bleakness, and it feels appropriate to read this when it s pitch black outside and pouring with rain, not on a nice summer s day In Romania in the 1960s and 1970s, Cioran was seen as a mysterious, almost mythological figure One would hear that such a person existed, but he became as invisible as the wind, and his books were so hard to get hold of, after he had departed his homeland some ten years before WW2 On the Heights of Despair, brings together all the themes from his later work, like loneliness, disease, death, suffering, the dark abyss, anguish, nothingness and madness sorry to put a downer on things He writes wholey like a man who is afraid his time on earth is almost up and he hasn t got to say all the things that bludgeoned his soul While reading through his writings, you clearly see a tormented man, tormented by the sheer intensity of his feelings, you see him getting out of bed so early in the morning to pour his inner turmoil down on paper like a form of exorcism Although pessimism dominates the book, look hard enough, and there are traces of optimism too Writing for Cioran was a realise, a kind of treatment I guess, a treatment but certainly not a cure, a way to at least find small pockets of relief from his obsessions and agonies An interesting read It s a shame that this is Cioran s most rated book in Goodreads, since it s not his best one at all and he knew it Too much downmarket lyricism, too juvenile, and both the cheap lyricism and juvenality aren t as poetic as he would have liked them to be we have Rimbaud for that, though Cioran regreted this style in his adult books That being said 1 This book has a few terrific moments, like the aphorism on the sterility of traditional wisemen.2 It was Beckett s favourite, no matter ho It s a shame that this is Cioran s most rated book in Goodreads, since it s not his best one at all and he knew it Too much downmarket lyricism, too juvenile, and both the cheap lyricism and juvenality aren t as poetic as he would have liked them to be we have Rimbaud for that, though Cioran regreted this style in his adult books That being said 1 This book has a few terrific moments, like the aphorism on the sterility of traditional wisemen.2 It was Beckett s favourite, no matter how good were Cioran s follow ups, for its sheer emotional voltage In a sense, Cioran never wrote such a borderline suicidal book, which has its artistic especially for a philosopher value, after all We live in an age in which it is almost a sin to be unhappy, this book is a fine antidote to that stupidity. Like many other books, this one is anything but an escape It impugns reality and swirls it around with words like chaos, insomnia, love, death, suicide and the like This is one of the most provocative books I have ever read It is very hard to give a review on this dark, extensional author who is commonly known as the king of pessimists.This was the first book I read by Ciroan, the then 22 year old Cioran managed to keep me up till 5 in the morning with shivers There is always a serious da Like many other books, this one is anything but an escape It impugns reality and swirls it around with words like chaos, insomnia, love, death, suicide and the like This is one of the most provocative books I have ever read It is very hard to give a review on this dark, extensional author who is commonly known as the king of pessimists.This was the first book I read by Ciroan, the then 22 year old Cioran managed to keep me up till 5 in the morning with shivers There is always a serious danger in repressing something which requires objectification he mentions in the beginning of the book and this is exactly what he did He picked up topics we have shunned down somewhere deep inside our head because of the agony, confusion or dismay they would cause He embodied those words made them sound way grave than I expected and pieced me with every word He often asksquestions than he answers and they arethan enough to get your heart racing with feelings of caducity, fragility and emptiness Nothingness, lyricism, the absurd, the world and I Cioran probed the reality of existence The iterate use of statements that implied the simulacra of a life created by the world is nothing but an illusion He urged the way of solitude, restlessness, madness and the indirect animals we already are In spite of all this, it is so ironically life affirming and inspiring I will never be able to be the same after reading this book also I have read it nearly every night since Love your unhappiness and hate yourhappiness, mix everything up, scramble it all Be a snowflake dancing in the air, aflower floating downstream Have courage when you don t need to, and be a cowardwhen you must be brave Who knows You may still be a winner And if you lose,does it really matter Is there anything to win in this world All gain is a loss, and all loss is a gain Why always expect a definite stance, clear ideas, and meaningful words Ifeel as if I should spout fire in response to all the questions which were ever put, ornot put, to me "/>
  • Paperback
  • 206 pages
  • Pe Culmile Disperării
  • Emil M. Cioran
  • English
  • 15 July 2019
  • 9732801689