Tree Crops: A Permanent Agriculture

Tree Crops: A Permanent Agriculture➹ Tree Crops: A Permanent Agriculture Free ➯ Author J. Russell Smith – Jobs-in-kingston.co.uk Tree Crops A Permanent Agriculture Livres NotRetrouvez Tree Crops A Permanent Agriculture et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasion Tree Crops A Permanent Agriculture ebook ePub Tree Crops A Permanent A Permanent MOBI · Agriculture Livres NotRetrouvez Tree Crops A Permanent Agriculture et des millions de livres en stock surAchetez neuf ou d occasion Tree Tree Crops: PDF/EPUB ² Crops A Permanent Agriculture ebook ePub JohnA Permanent Agriculture, Tree Crops, John Russell Smith, Devin Adair Publishing Co Wendell Berry, Island Press Des milliers de livres Crops: A Permanent ePUB ´ avec la livraison chez vous enjour ou en magasin avec tree crops Traduction franaise Linguee A basic premise of the Sustainable Tree Crops Program STCP is that, to produce cocoa sustainably, small scale farmers need to develop knowledge of biological processes and understand interactions in the cocoa agro ecosystem to be able to make sound management decisions What Are Tree Crops with pictures wiseGEEK Tree crops are groves or orchards of trees grown for some type of economic or environmental benefit While fruit or nut trees are the most common type of tree crop, trees may also be grown as crops for other purposes Tree crops may be grown in massive quantities but are also popular for small businesses and family farms In many regions, these crops make up a significant portion of Tree Crops A Permanent Agriculture World Get Your FREE Digital Copy Of The Tree Crops A Permanent Agriculture By J Russell Smith Now Tree Crops A Permanent Agriculture By J Russell Smith Free Instant Access Enter Your Best Email Below And We ll Send you a FREE Copy Of The Book Tree Crops A Permanent Agriculture By J Russell Smith Get Access Now Your information is safe with us and will not be shared with any thirdRussell Smith Tree Crops ToCPDF Tree Crops, a Permanent Agriculture He first published his landmark text, Tree Crops, A Permanent Agriculture in , in which he described the value of tree crops for producing food and animal feed on sloping, marginal, and rocky tree crops Traduction en franais exemples anglaisThese regions have a heavy concentration on the production of tree crops olives, fruit, citrus , vines, and vegetables which are adapted to the climate and terrain L activit agricole de ces rgions se concentre particulirement sur l arboriculture fruitire olives, fruits, agrumes , la viticulture et les lgumes, spculations adaptes au climat et au terrain sustainable tree crops Traduction franaise Linguee De trs nombreux exemples de phrases traduites contenant sustainable tree crops Dictionnaire franais anglais et moteur de recherche de traductions franaises Joining NZTCA Tree Crops Become a Member of NZTCA The NZ Tree Crops Association promotes interest and research in the use of trees for fruit and nut production, animal fodder, bee forage, energy, multi tier farming orcharding, shelter, timber and soil and water conservation. Tree Crops is a classic of the permaculture movement, probably the main inspiration for the name In practice, the book is littlethan a suggestion, or an exhortation, to transition to a perennial polyculture system for the US It s super progressive for its time, of course, but the writing style and amount of information unfortunately are not Rather, Smith simply describes what each tree could be used for and then quotes a bunch of letters he obtained from farmers and extension agents cor Tree Crops is a classic of the permaculture movement, probably the main inspiration for the name In practice, the book is littlethan a suggestion, or an exhortation, to transition to a perennial polyculture system for the US It s super progressive for its time, of course, but the writing style and amount of information unfortunately are not Rather, Smith simply describes what each tree could be used for and then quotes a bunch of letters he obtained from farmers and extension agents corroborating the claim that the trees could be so used It s a good source of ideas though most of the good ones are probably easier found inrecent literature It s hard to imagine how much better things might be now had Smith s recommendations been followed when he made them He suggests a massive research program, primarily, in order to develop new open pollinated and hybrid varieties of fruits and nuts, and determine the best way to integrate the trees into a functional economic system that could replace annual crops It s largely a response to the Dustbowl soil loss issue, part of the soil conservation movement launched by Walter C Lowdermilk and Vernon Carter s Topsoil and Civilization That movement had a very ecologically shallow point of view on conservation, so unfortunately Smith is an extension of Pinchot s mindset Smith never mentions a single reason to plant tree crops other than their action in conserving soil he talks about increasing yield and low work input too, but treats thatlike a bonus than a real reason to transition None of the reasons we prize agroforestry systems ecosystem services built in, forest structure mimicry preserves biodiversity come up.If you re really into woody perennial polyculture, this is a book you probably ought to have looked through at one point, but it s not much of a resource, and I can t think of any reason to recommend it to anyone else Joseph Russell Smith 1874 1966 was a geography professor who grew up in the chestnut forests of Virginia His book Tree Crops was originally published in 1929 Smith wrote it because he was horrified by the soil destruction caused by regularly tilling cropland and hillside tilling drove him completely out of his mind, because it permanently destroyed good land at a much faster rate Everyone knew this, but they kept doing it anyway, because they were cursed with a short term mindset.Tilling Joseph Russell Smith 1874 1966 was a geography professor who grew up in the chestnut forests of Virginia His book Tree Crops was originally published in 1929 Smith wrote it because he was horrified by the soil destruction caused by regularly tilling cropland and hillside tilling drove him completely out of his mind, because it permanently destroyed good land at a much faster rate Everyone knew this, but they kept doing it anyway, because they were cursed with a short term mindset.Tilling was a common practice in those days and it s still popular today Farmers tilled because their daddies tilled, and their grandpas tilled, and their great grandpas tilled in the old country It was a powerful dirty habit that was nearly impossible to quit, until the land died and it provided no long term benefits With great exasperation, Smith exclaimed Corn, the killer of continents, is one of the worst enemies of the human future Old World crops like wheat, barley, rye, and oats provided a dense ground cover that slowed the rate of soil erosion a bit New World crops like corn, potatoes, cotton, and tobacco were row crops that left the tilled soil exposed, andvulnerable to erosion In America, thunderstorms were common, producing downpours that were rare in Europe Heavy rains filled the streams with lost topsoil In the Cotton Belt, Smith saw erosion gullies that were 150 feet deep Oklahoma was ruined with stunning speed We were destroying land that could have fed millions An Old World saying sums it up After the man the desert In the legends of our ancient wild ancestors, the First Commandment is Thou shalt not till Joseph was a brilliant visionary, and one day he received an illuminating revelation If you wanted to stop the destruction of soils caused by tilling, quit tilling Live in a different way Create a cuisine that majors in nutritious soil friendly foods Smith envisioned two story farms tree crops on the sloped land, and pastures for livestock below, both perennial Farmers could abandon tilling forever, and pass the land on to future generations in a healthier condition Imagine that.Farmers scratched their heads when they heard this idea, and werethan a little perplexed and befuddled Agroforestry wasn t a mainstream tradition in European American agriculture The required knowledgebase didn t exist, so Smith researched it and wrote it down His book is mostly a scrapbook of correspondence Smith sent letters to hundreds of experts on tree crops, and then assembled their responses into a book He created an amazing collection of information, including recommendations for agroforestry in other climates and continents.Hogs won t touch corn if there are acorns to eat, and oaks can producecalories per acre than grain, when done right A top quality pecan tree can drop nearly a ton of nuts per year Hickory nuts can be smashed and boiled to produce hickory oil Pistachios fetch a high price and have a long shelf life Many types of pines produce nuts The honey locust is a drought hearty US native that will grow where corn or cotton grows, and animals love the beans The sugar maple produces sugar Persimmons are enjoyed by man and beast Pigs and chickens love mulberries And don t forget walnuts, beechnuts, almonds, cherry pits, soapnuts, holly, ginko, pawpaw, horse chestnut, osage orange, privet, wattle, wild plums, and choke cherries The list goes on and on Trees can produce high quality foods, and they can be grown on slopes too steep to plow Once the trees are established, little labor is needed until harvest time Tree crops can be muchproductive than mere pastures or forests They typically suffer less from dry spells than field crops Over time, they can actually build new topsoil Like any crop, trees are vulnerable to pests, diseases, fire, and extreme weather Like any crop, tree crops are not 100 percent dependable, year after year, so monocultures are not a wise choice The Second Commandment is Thou shalt encourage diversity Smith witnessed the blight epidemic that wiped out virtually all of the American chestnuts, rapidly killing millions of trees He personally lost 25 acres of chestnuts The blight fungus came to America on chestnut trees imported from Asia Knowing this, it s shocking that Smith advocated travelling the world in search of better varieties of trees, to bring home and experiment with Hey, Japanese walnuts And the USDA helped him The Third Commandment is Thou shalt leave Japanese organisms in Japan Smith was a tree loving zealot who was on a mission from God, and he promoted his great ideas with great enthusiasm But the world did not leap to attention, change its ways, and promptly end soil erosion as we know it Farmers are almost as conservative as popes, and they are not fans of radical change especially ideas that tie up land for decades before producing the first penny Joseph was heartbroken The longer I live, theamazed I become at the lack of constructive imagination, the lack of sheer curiosity, the desire to know It s not easy being a brilliant visionary Smith s grand vision was reasonable, rational, and ecologically far superior to growing organic crops on tilled fields Tree crops remain an important subject for the dreams of those who do not robotically march in lockstep with the status quo hordes Planting America s hills with tree crops would be an immense task, creating many jobs, and providing benefits for generations Why don t we do it The Fourth Commandment is Thou shalt live in a manner that is beneficial to the generations yet to be born I marveled throughout reading this book that it was actually written in the 1920s This guy, as far as sustainable farming goes, is right in step with if not still ahead of modern food activists He literally believed that the staple foods of america should be changed and that the Dept of Agriculture was focusing its time and money on the wrong crops This book convinces me that there are many lifetimes of work to do with tree crops and that I should have started planting my tree farm yesterda I marveled throughout reading this book that it was actually written in the 1920s This guy, as far as sustainable farming goes, is right in step with if not still ahead of modern food activists He literally believed that the staple foods of america should be changed and that the Dept of Agriculture was focusing its time and money on the wrong crops This book convinces me that there are many lifetimes of work to do with tree crops and that I should have started planting my tree farm yesterday This book is strikingly relevant, even ninety years after publication There are many inspiring thoughts and suggestions throughout, and it is written in a very approachable and enjoyable style Among other great features, one of the appendices includes a practical and illustrated guide to grafting nut trees Tree Crops A Permanent Agriculture is in the public domain, and a free pdf of the complete text is available here This book is strikingly relevant, even ninety years after publication There are many inspiring thoughts and suggestions throughout, and it is written in a very approachable and enjoyable style Among other great features, one of the appendices includes a practical and illustrated guide to grafting nut trees Tree Crops A Permanent Agriculture is in the public domain, and a free pdf of the complete text is available here The author makes a strong case for tree crops both in terms of productivity and soil conservation.Excellent book, well worth reading.I wish I had read it 25 years ago It may have helped me better plan the trees in my garden. I give this book five stars because of its amazing foresight Written in 1929 and last updated in 1950, this is one of the original books on permaculture Quite likely a source to the term with its subtitle A Permanent Agriculture.Mr Smith talks about the destruction of the environment through the importation of agricultural practices designed for the level plains to the hillside slopes and the ensuing erosion through wind and rain He talks about the increased yields of incorporating a canop I give this book five stars because of its amazing foresight Written in 1929 and last updated in 1950, this is one of the original books on permaculture Quite likely a source to the term with its subtitle A Permanent Agriculture.Mr Smith talks about the destruction of the environment through the importation of agricultural practices designed for the level plains to the hillside slopes and the ensuing erosion through wind and rain He talks about the increased yields of incorporating a canopy crop adjacent to a field crop and the outright superiority of tree crops in given environments.The state of Oklahoma was utterly ruined in the short time frame of 1890 to the 1920 s due to the poorly applied modern agriculture.This book is primarily a reference book of tree species As such, I primarily skimmed through it That notwithstanding, it remains an important work in the history of ecology.I particularly like the authors analogy that if an invading nation were to come and wreak the sort of havoc that we have wrought on our own country, that we would be motivated to take up arms against them But, as we do unto ourselves what we would allow no other, we have no sense of urgency or panic.There is reason to panic.This mismanagement has increased the flooding of our rivers and destroyed lands that would have been productive under basic tree cropping principles.Trees producecrop per acre on a perennial basis than do the annual crops They are less susceptible to drought, frost, flooding and fire From a human nutrition standpoint their fruits and nuts areeasily digestible and nutrient dense than the traditional grain crops.The author was warning over 90 years ago of avoiding the folly of continuing to follow our path to self destruction through thoughtless land management I am shocked at how little we have learned Visionary book on the future of farming and feeding humans and livestock Because of its sometimes long winded prose as well as being american centric, it is not meant as a practitioners guide It is especially a worthwhile read, because it reveals the extent to which the roadmap, what this work essentially is, has been ignored over the century since, and with all the adverse consequences that came with it.The book has a chapter devoted to the philosophy of farming trees Was there a state appr Visionary book on the future of farming and feeding humans and livestock Because of its sometimes long winded prose as well as being american centric, it is not meant as a practitioners guide It is especially a worthwhile read, because it reveals the extent to which the roadmap, what this work essentially is, has been ignored over the century since, and with all the adverse consequences that came with it.The book has a chapter devoted to the philosophy of farming trees Was there a state appropriation or congressional appropriation to back the invention of the telegraph No These things are done with private money to urge an idea The author hence correctly makes the point that restoring lands for sustainable food production must therefore come from private enterprise and cannot be expected to be adopted as a matter of policy.A wealth of information, copious footnotes and richly illustrated, not just with photos, but also graphs and tables and thereby ahead of its time An excellent introduction to potential perennial tree crops, and their application in agriculture, focusing on the production of animal fodder and feed Particularly notable for the close study of existing practices of the era, before machine agriculture swept so many world traditions aside Smith provides both accounts of his own travels to personally witness many of the worlds wonders of agroforstry, and also shares letters he solicited from various farmers telling their experiences with diffe An excellent introduction to potential perennial tree crops, and their application in agriculture, focusing on the production of animal fodder and feed Particularly notable for the close study of existing practices of the era, before machine agriculture swept so many world traditions aside Smith provides both accounts of his own travels to personally witness many of the worlds wonders of agroforstry, and also shares letters he solicited from various farmers telling their experiences with different productive trees.Possibly the most valuable book I have read on tree crops for a temperate climate A very fascinating book for anyone interested in nature, trees, and growing things I learned a lot of things I hadn t known about which trees could potentially be valuable as crops. Good book on agroforestry

Tree Crops: A Permanent Agriculture Epub ä Tree
    EPUB is an ebook file format that uses the epub Program STCP is that, to produce cocoa sustainably, small scale farmers need to develop knowledge of biological processes and understand interactions in the cocoa agro ecosystem to be able to make sound management decisions What Are Tree Crops with pictures wiseGEEK Tree crops are groves or orchards of trees grown for some type of economic or environmental benefit While fruit or nut trees are the most common type of tree crop, trees may also be grown as crops for other purposes Tree crops may be grown in massive quantities but are also popular for small businesses and family farms In many regions, these crops make up a significant portion of Tree Crops A Permanent Agriculture World Get Your FREE Digital Copy Of The Tree Crops A Permanent Agriculture By J Russell Smith Now Tree Crops A Permanent Agriculture By J Russell Smith Free Instant Access Enter Your Best Email Below And We ll Send you a FREE Copy Of The Book Tree Crops A Permanent Agriculture By J Russell Smith Get Access Now Your information is safe with us and will not be shared with any thirdRussell Smith Tree Crops ToCPDF Tree Crops, a Permanent Agriculture He first published his landmark text, Tree Crops, A Permanent Agriculture in , in which he described the value of tree crops for producing food and animal feed on sloping, marginal, and rocky tree crops Traduction en franais exemples anglaisThese regions have a heavy concentration on the production of tree crops olives, fruit, citrus , vines, and vegetables which are adapted to the climate and terrain L activit agricole de ces rgions se concentre particulirement sur l arboriculture fruitire olives, fruits, agrumes , la viticulture et les lgumes, spculations adaptes au climat et au terrain sustainable tree crops Traduction franaise Linguee De trs nombreux exemples de phrases traduites contenant sustainable tree crops Dictionnaire franais anglais et moteur de recherche de traductions franaises Joining NZTCA Tree Crops Become a Member of NZTCA The NZ Tree Crops Association promotes interest and research in the use of trees for fruit and nut production, animal fodder, bee forage, energy, multi tier farming orcharding, shelter, timber and soil and water conservation. Tree Crops is a classic of the permaculture movement, probably the main inspiration for the name In practice, the book is littlethan a suggestion, or an exhortation, to transition to a perennial polyculture system for the US It s super progressive for its time, of course, but the writing style and amount of information unfortunately are not Rather, Smith simply describes what each tree could be used for and then quotes a bunch of letters he obtained from farmers and extension agents cor Tree Crops is a classic of the permaculture movement, probably the main inspiration for the name In practice, the book is littlethan a suggestion, or an exhortation, to transition to a perennial polyculture system for the US It s super progressive for its time, of course, but the writing style and amount of information unfortunately are not Rather, Smith simply describes what each tree could be used for and then quotes a bunch of letters he obtained from farmers and extension agents corroborating the claim that the trees could be so used It s a good source of ideas though most of the good ones are probably easier found inrecent literature It s hard to imagine how much better things might be now had Smith s recommendations been followed when he made them He suggests a massive research program, primarily, in order to develop new open pollinated and hybrid varieties of fruits and nuts, and determine the best way to integrate the trees into a functional economic system that could replace annual crops It s largely a response to the Dustbowl soil loss issue, part of the soil conservation movement launched by Walter C Lowdermilk and Vernon Carter s Topsoil and Civilization That movement had a very ecologically shallow point of view on conservation, so unfortunately Smith is an extension of Pinchot s mindset Smith never mentions a single reason to plant tree crops other than their action in conserving soil he talks about increasing yield and low work input too, but treats thatlike a bonus than a real reason to transition None of the reasons we prize agroforestry systems ecosystem services built in, forest structure mimicry preserves biodiversity come up.If you re really into woody perennial polyculture, this is a book you probably ought to have looked through at one point, but it s not much of a resource, and I can t think of any reason to recommend it to anyone else Joseph Russell Smith 1874 1966 was a geography professor who grew up in the chestnut forests of Virginia His book Tree Crops was originally published in 1929 Smith wrote it because he was horrified by the soil destruction caused by regularly tilling cropland and hillside tilling drove him completely out of his mind, because it permanently destroyed good land at a much faster rate Everyone knew this, but they kept doing it anyway, because they were cursed with a short term mindset.Tilling Joseph Russell Smith 1874 1966 was a geography professor who grew up in the chestnut forests of Virginia His book Tree Crops was originally published in 1929 Smith wrote it because he was horrified by the soil destruction caused by regularly tilling cropland and hillside tilling drove him completely out of his mind, because it permanently destroyed good land at a much faster rate Everyone knew this, but they kept doing it anyway, because they were cursed with a short term mindset.Tilling was a common practice in those days and it s still popular today Farmers tilled because their daddies tilled, and their grandpas tilled, and their great grandpas tilled in the old country It was a powerful dirty habit that was nearly impossible to quit, until the land died and it provided no long term benefits With great exasperation, Smith exclaimed Corn, the killer of continents, is one of the worst enemies of the human future Old World crops like wheat, barley, rye, and oats provided a dense ground cover that slowed the rate of soil erosion a bit New World crops like corn, potatoes, cotton, and tobacco were row crops that left the tilled soil exposed, andvulnerable to erosion In America, thunderstorms were common, producing downpours that were rare in Europe Heavy rains filled the streams with lost topsoil In the Cotton Belt, Smith saw erosion gullies that were 150 feet deep Oklahoma was ruined with stunning speed We were destroying land that could have fed millions An Old World saying sums it up After the man the desert In the legends of our ancient wild ancestors, the First Commandment is Thou shalt not till Joseph was a brilliant visionary, and one day he received an illuminating revelation If you wanted to stop the destruction of soils caused by tilling, quit tilling Live in a different way Create a cuisine that majors in nutritious soil friendly foods Smith envisioned two story farms tree crops on the sloped land, and pastures for livestock below, both perennial Farmers could abandon tilling forever, and pass the land on to future generations in a healthier condition Imagine that.Farmers scratched their heads when they heard this idea, and werethan a little perplexed and befuddled Agroforestry wasn t a mainstream tradition in European American agriculture The required knowledgebase didn t exist, so Smith researched it and wrote it down His book is mostly a scrapbook of correspondence Smith sent letters to hundreds of experts on tree crops, and then assembled their responses into a book He created an amazing collection of information, including recommendations for agroforestry in other climates and continents.Hogs won t touch corn if there are acorns to eat, and oaks can producecalories per acre than grain, when done right A top quality pecan tree can drop nearly a ton of nuts per year Hickory nuts can be smashed and boiled to produce hickory oil Pistachios fetch a high price and have a long shelf life Many types of pines produce nuts The honey locust is a drought hearty US native that will grow where corn or cotton grows, and animals love the beans The sugar maple produces sugar Persimmons are enjoyed by man and beast Pigs and chickens love mulberries And don t forget walnuts, beechnuts, almonds, cherry pits, soapnuts, holly, ginko, pawpaw, horse chestnut, osage orange, privet, wattle, wild plums, and choke cherries The list goes on and on Trees can produce high quality foods, and they can be grown on slopes too steep to plow Once the trees are established, little labor is needed until harvest time Tree crops can be muchproductive than mere pastures or forests They typically suffer less from dry spells than field crops Over time, they can actually build new topsoil Like any crop, trees are vulnerable to pests, diseases, fire, and extreme weather Like any crop, tree crops are not 100 percent dependable, year after year, so monocultures are not a wise choice The Second Commandment is Thou shalt encourage diversity Smith witnessed the blight epidemic that wiped out virtually all of the American chestnuts, rapidly killing millions of trees He personally lost 25 acres of chestnuts The blight fungus came to America on chestnut trees imported from Asia Knowing this, it s shocking that Smith advocated travelling the world in search of better varieties of trees, to bring home and experiment with Hey, Japanese walnuts And the USDA helped him The Third Commandment is Thou shalt leave Japanese organisms in Japan Smith was a tree loving zealot who was on a mission from God, and he promoted his great ideas with great enthusiasm But the world did not leap to attention, change its ways, and promptly end soil erosion as we know it Farmers are almost as conservative as popes, and they are not fans of radical change especially ideas that tie up land for decades before producing the first penny Joseph was heartbroken The longer I live, theamazed I become at the lack of constructive imagination, the lack of sheer curiosity, the desire to know It s not easy being a brilliant visionary Smith s grand vision was reasonable, rational, and ecologically far superior to growing organic crops on tilled fields Tree crops remain an important subject for the dreams of those who do not robotically march in lockstep with the status quo hordes Planting America s hills with tree crops would be an immense task, creating many jobs, and providing benefits for generations Why don t we do it The Fourth Commandment is Thou shalt live in a manner that is beneficial to the generations yet to be born I marveled throughout reading this book that it was actually written in the 1920s This guy, as far as sustainable farming goes, is right in step with if not still ahead of modern food activists He literally believed that the staple foods of america should be changed and that the Dept of Agriculture was focusing its time and money on the wrong crops This book convinces me that there are many lifetimes of work to do with tree crops and that I should have started planting my tree farm yesterda I marveled throughout reading this book that it was actually written in the 1920s This guy, as far as sustainable farming goes, is right in step with if not still ahead of modern food activists He literally believed that the staple foods of america should be changed and that the Dept of Agriculture was focusing its time and money on the wrong crops This book convinces me that there are many lifetimes of work to do with tree crops and that I should have started planting my tree farm yesterday This book is strikingly relevant, even ninety years after publication There are many inspiring thoughts and suggestions throughout, and it is written in a very approachable and enjoyable style Among other great features, one of the appendices includes a practical and illustrated guide to grafting nut trees Tree Crops A Permanent Agriculture is in the public domain, and a free pdf of the complete text is available here This book is strikingly relevant, even ninety years after publication There are many inspiring thoughts and suggestions throughout, and it is written in a very approachable and enjoyable style Among other great features, one of the appendices includes a practical and illustrated guide to grafting nut trees Tree Crops A Permanent Agriculture is in the public domain, and a free pdf of the complete text is available here The author makes a strong case for tree crops both in terms of productivity and soil conservation.Excellent book, well worth reading.I wish I had read it 25 years ago It may have helped me better plan the trees in my garden. I give this book five stars because of its amazing foresight Written in 1929 and last updated in 1950, this is one of the original books on permaculture Quite likely a source to the term with its subtitle A Permanent Agriculture.Mr Smith talks about the destruction of the environment through the importation of agricultural practices designed for the level plains to the hillside slopes and the ensuing erosion through wind and rain He talks about the increased yields of incorporating a canop I give this book five stars because of its amazing foresight Written in 1929 and last updated in 1950, this is one of the original books on permaculture Quite likely a source to the term with its subtitle A Permanent Agriculture.Mr Smith talks about the destruction of the environment through the importation of agricultural practices designed for the level plains to the hillside slopes and the ensuing erosion through wind and rain He talks about the increased yields of incorporating a canopy crop adjacent to a field crop and the outright superiority of tree crops in given environments.The state of Oklahoma was utterly ruined in the short time frame of 1890 to the 1920 s due to the poorly applied modern agriculture.This book is primarily a reference book of tree species As such, I primarily skimmed through it That notwithstanding, it remains an important work in the history of ecology.I particularly like the authors analogy that if an invading nation were to come and wreak the sort of havoc that we have wrought on our own country, that we would be motivated to take up arms against them But, as we do unto ourselves what we would allow no other, we have no sense of urgency or panic.There is reason to panic.This mismanagement has increased the flooding of our rivers and destroyed lands that would have been productive under basic tree cropping principles.Trees producecrop per acre on a perennial basis than do the annual crops They are less susceptible to drought, frost, flooding and fire From a human nutrition standpoint their fruits and nuts areeasily digestible and nutrient dense than the traditional grain crops.The author was warning over 90 years ago of avoiding the folly of continuing to follow our path to self destruction through thoughtless land management I am shocked at how little we have learned Visionary book on the future of farming and feeding humans and livestock Because of its sometimes long winded prose as well as being american centric, it is not meant as a practitioners guide It is especially a worthwhile read, because it reveals the extent to which the roadmap, what this work essentially is, has been ignored over the century since, and with all the adverse consequences that came with it.The book has a chapter devoted to the philosophy of farming trees Was there a state appr Visionary book on the future of farming and feeding humans and livestock Because of its sometimes long winded prose as well as being american centric, it is not meant as a practitioners guide It is especially a worthwhile read, because it reveals the extent to which the roadmap, what this work essentially is, has been ignored over the century since, and with all the adverse consequences that came with it.The book has a chapter devoted to the philosophy of farming trees Was there a state appropriation or congressional appropriation to back the invention of the telegraph No These things are done with private money to urge an idea The author hence correctly makes the point that restoring lands for sustainable food production must therefore come from private enterprise and cannot be expected to be adopted as a matter of policy.A wealth of information, copious footnotes and richly illustrated, not just with photos, but also graphs and tables and thereby ahead of its time An excellent introduction to potential perennial tree crops, and their application in agriculture, focusing on the production of animal fodder and feed Particularly notable for the close study of existing practices of the era, before machine agriculture swept so many world traditions aside Smith provides both accounts of his own travels to personally witness many of the worlds wonders of agroforstry, and also shares letters he solicited from various farmers telling their experiences with diffe An excellent introduction to potential perennial tree crops, and their application in agriculture, focusing on the production of animal fodder and feed Particularly notable for the close study of existing practices of the era, before machine agriculture swept so many world traditions aside Smith provides both accounts of his own travels to personally witness many of the worlds wonders of agroforstry, and also shares letters he solicited from various farmers telling their experiences with different productive trees.Possibly the most valuable book I have read on tree crops for a temperate climate A very fascinating book for anyone interested in nature, trees, and growing things I learned a lot of things I hadn t known about which trees could potentially be valuable as crops. Good book on agroforestry "/>
  • Paperback
  • 422 pages
  • Tree Crops: A Permanent Agriculture
  • J. Russell Smith
  • English
  • 01 September 2018
  • 0933280440