Hojoki: Visions of a Torn World

Hojoki: Visions of a Torn World[Reading] ➽ Hojoki: Visions of a Torn World Author Kamo no Chōmei – Jobs-in-kingston.co.uk The single great work of literary witness in medieval Japan, Hojoki is a short social chronicle prompted by a series of calamities that overtook old Kyoto in the late th century By building a rude hom of a PDF/EPUB Á The single great work of literary witness in medieval Japan, Hojoki is a Hojoki: Visions PDF/EPUB ² short social chronicle prompted by a series of calamities that overtook old Kyoto in Visions of a Kindle Ó the late th century By building a rude home in the forest and eliminating desire, poet and Buddhist priest Chomei believed he would be spared the anguish that had befallen the townspeople Yet at the end we find the author consumed with self doubt, questioning his own sanity and the integrity of his purpose His voice reaches out from the distant past and speaks directly to our hearts, surprisingly modern and intensely humanAuthor Biography Yasuhiko Moriguchi and David Jenkins are writers, teachers, and translators living in KyotoStone Bridge Press is a leading English language publisher of Japanese literature in translation Our ROCK SPRING COLLECTION OF JAPANESE LITERATURE features absorbing and important translations of classical and contemporary Japanese fiction and poetry We believe that literature is a window into culture and society, and an expression of what is most peculiarly, and universally, human. I ve read listened to this book by accident I started playing the audiobook for Narrow Road to the Interior And Other Writings but this short little gem came first I ve never heard of the author before but I am glad I stumbled across him Kamo no Ch mei is a medieval Japanese writer,poet and essayist who takes the Buddhist vows becoming a monkThe flowing river never stops and yet the water never stays the same Foam floats upon the pools, scattering, re forming, never lingering long SoI ve read listened to this book by accident I started playing the audiobook for Narrow Road to the Interior And Other Writings but this short little gem came first I ve never heard of the author before but I am glad I stumbled across him Kamo no Ch mei is a medieval Japanese writer,poet and essayist who takes the Buddhist vows becoming a monkThe flowing river never stops and yet the water never stays the same Foam floats upon the pools, scattering, re forming, never lingering long So it is with man and all his dwelling places here on earth The above is the first paragraph of the book and I was mesmerized by its beauty The author continues to discuss the impermanence of life Then, he presents a series of disasters that he witnessed, natural and man made The hopeless view of the world made him decide to retreat outside the capital and become a hermit The author describes in great detail the tiny hut he builds, his daily activities and the reasons he decided to go on this path in order to find peace of mind The audiobook was narrated by the actor Togo Igawa which enhanced the Japanese feel of the writing Unfortunately, the Narrow Road is narrated by a different person whose accent is way too thick to be able to understand everything Below the crimson skies shivers the last leaf,Sings the blue bird, songs of a lonely treeI wonder where, swallowed by the spring rain,Floats the leaf, to claim a spotted graveThe sounds from Hojoki deeply permeate,Heart of a one room hut, poetry and music rhymeNestled within an early bud, what do I see Glimpses of Lotus Sutra, one man s pilgrimage.Five deciding elements of nature persuading the humble origin of the supreme fruition of man conceptualising the ephemeral life, the sensibility of ma Below the crimson skies shivers the last leaf,Sings the blue bird, songs of a lonely treeI wonder where, swallowed by the spring rain,Floats the leaf, to claim a spotted graveThe sounds from Hojoki deeply permeate,Heart of a one room hut, poetry and music rhymeNestled within an early bud, what do I see Glimpses of Lotus Sutra, one man s pilgrimage.Five deciding elements of nature persuading the humble origin of the supreme fruition of man conceptualising the ephemeral life, the sensibility of man imparting the teachings of the universe from a ten foot square hut attuned to the immortality of a poet s soul All things are imperfect All things are incomplete The image of Amida dwelling among the sanctimonious mountains, the Law of Buddha shinning through the soft cerise lotus petals and the bloom of the lotus in the murky waters spiritualizing the beauty coaxed through the ugliness of stagnation defining the modest truth of the nature The inevitable cosmos emerging from nothingness, accepting the transient inhabitation weaved into a metaphysical web of turbulence, isolation, hazards and tranquillity, devolving towards the exquisiteness of human totality fading into the depth of nothingness Humanistic traditions expanding the sensory ambivalence of nature in the spirituality of the mind the inevitable extinction evocating the aesthetics of existence in tender solitude of nothingness in the core of simplicity Thewabi sabiof the universe, in its purest form A house and its masterare like the dew that gatherson the morning glory Which will be the first to pass Sometimes the dew falls awaywhile the flowers stay.More permanent than the emergence of birth is the oblivion of death and the fleeting journey in between is something called life the ultimate pioneering grace of music and poetry The inception of bloom and lush, the dew on flowers awaits the morning sun falling then into the decay of the dusk A wasted beauty it is not, the man who builds a house for warmth only to die out in the cold comprehending the transitory nature of man and his dwelling Of the four elements,water, fire, and windoften cause great damage.Earth does not so oftenbring catastrophe..Earth is forever metamorphosing into the permanence of deathly grave a respite for the victims of impermanence And, when fearsome earthquakes engulf the vanities of the world, nature becomes the supreme equalizer of mankind You can t control nature, simply learn from it, the greatest educator Sinful times That I should witnesssuch a dreadful thing Kamo no Chomei 1153 1216 was the second son of a Shinto priest in Kyoto One of the leading poets of the late Heian Period at the imperial court, Chomei s powerful intensity in the poetry and music engaged the phenomenon of nature with the intricacies of human life The notion of the universe destructing and constructing concurrently progresses the comprehensive system of nothingness embedded in the Chomei s poetic verses The elegance of Chomei s well crafted text mirrors the world he survived whilst recognising the legitimacy of nature and its association with man the fire destroyedsixteen noble houses who knows how manyI heard one thirdof the entire capital In this famed Japanese literary marvel deriving its titular inspiration from the tiny hermit hut built by Chomei himself during his pilgrimage in the mountainous towards the divinity of solitude spinning the , Kamo no Chomei scripts through various brush strokes the devastation of famine 1180 , the Kyoto fire 1175 CE , the great earthquake 1185 , deaths, floods, whirlwinds, political upheavals in the imperial court , yearning to banish materialistic hierarchy and in the end his pilgrimage to acquire a peaceful mind and the pristine beauty of simplicity nurtured in solitude In 1204, Chomei adhered to the teachings of Buddhism and lived a life of a recluse monk in the foothills of Mount Hino The path to enlightenment disentangles the dilemma of possessing an impure heart dwelling in the woods of discipline and retribution The enjoyment of simple company and by the means of mind and body as the only trustworthy entity for health and strength depicts the philosophy of Buddha and the wholesomeness of shunya zero Anold silkworm spinning its last cocoon , Chomei contemplates on the benevolent beauty of rural life endowed with materialistic emancipation and minimalism achieved through remoteness from the burdensome world On the road to achieving tranquillity, Chomei expresses Fish do not hate the water.But then, none can knowthe happiness of the fishunless he is one.A quiet life is much the same.How would anyone know itwithout living it The four metamorphosing seasons equating the four defining phases of human life, ceaselessly flow like the river reverberating vanity of time concealed beneath the watery whims of impermanence From the tenderness of glorious spring to the culmination of frosty snow, the poetic immortality of Kamo no Chomei defies the reluctant nature meditating through ethereal silence the transitory passage of man and the phenomenon of nature The flowing rivernever stopsand yet the waternever staysthe same Foam floatsupon the pools,scattering, re forming,never lingering long So it is with manand all his dwelling placeshere on earth. Calligraphy by Hon ami K etsu 1558 1637 , Underpainting attributed to Tawaraya S tatsu died ca 1640 , Poem by Kamo no Chomei ca 1154 1216 If we follow the ways of the world, things are hard for us if we refuse to follow them, we appear to have gone mad.As I understand it,Hojokiis read by every Japanese student in school and had a great influence on much that was subsequently written in Japanese It is one of the key texts of the Japanese culture Written by Kamo no Chomei in 1212 dCalligraphy by Hon ami K etsu 1558 1637 , Underpainting attributed to Tawaraya S tatsu died ca 1640 , Poem by Kamo no Chomei ca 1154 1216 If we follow the ways of the world, things are hard for us if we refuse to follow them, we appear to have gone mad.As I understand it,Hojokiis read by every Japanese student in school and had a great influence on much that was subsequently written in Japanese It is one of the key texts of the Japanese culture Written by Kamo no Chomei in 1212 during the collapse of the Heian dynasty, it is a poetically dense text, whether it is rendered in free verse, as is done in this book, or into prose, as is done by Donald Keene in his pioneeringAnthology of Japanese LiteratureAn earlier reviewer wrote However, it seems inadequate lacking in richness of human experience I beg to differ In a highly distilled poetic language Chomei describes the destruction of one third of Kyoto by a ravaging fire in 1177 with the concomitant horrible deaths then a monstrous tornado tore a swath 2 kilometers long through the city in 1180 Shortly thereafter the Emperor decided to move the capital, creating huge problems for the populace, totally uprooting their lives six months later the Emperor moved the capital back to Kyoto A two year long famine followed in 1181 1182, and Chomei evokes the terrible consequences and the altruistic acts of some of the inhabitants As if that weren t enough, a great earthquake leveled the city in 1185 These are indicated in brief, sharp strokes of the brush, not dwelt upon in gory detail as would be done now Chomei, who converted to Buddhism, supplements these clearly drawn illustrations of the precariousness of life and property with further examples of the problems of attachment to property, ambition, social status, loved ones, life After many disappointments and losses, Chomei withdraws from the world, builds and lives in a series of wooden huts in the countryside he lovingly describes his simple life there Some lines from this sectionThen in winter snow It settles just like human sin and melts, in atonement He plays music, writes, watches Nature, shares long walks with a 10 year old boy who occasionally visits, remembers friends and family, gathers from Nature the necessities to satisfy his very modest food and clothing needs But he is aware that he is now attached to his very simple life and reproaches himself for not being as mindful as some figures of Buddhist legend He is stuck in the quandary inherent in every absolute idealTo these questions of mind, there is no answer So now I use my impure tongue to offer a few prayers to Amida and then silenceAmida is the Buddha of comprehensive love OK,Hojokiis notWar and PeaceorA Tale of Two Citiesit is 15 pages long in Keene s prose version But I rather doubt that any 15 pages in those books are as dense in human experience asHojokiis Be that as it may, I find this to be a rich and moving text to which I often return My gratitude is due to the translators of this free verse version for providing another view of the text for those of us with no Japanese I have the feeling that I will re read thisoften than Keene s fine prose version Gentle prose The beginning reminds me of The Book of Ecclesiastes, warning the reader that all is vanity, one doesn t know what nature will do to your prized possessions. Kamo no Chomei about 1155 1216 CE was a low level Japanese aristocrat during the late Heian Period and Early Kamakura Period Having experienced frustrations in terms of political advancement and having lived through a series of natural disasters, he became a Buddhist monk, a recluse, and an author His short work, Hojoki variously translated into English as An Account of My Hut or An Account of a Ten Foot Hut , has become a Japanese classic, an exposition of the Buddhist insight of impermane Kamo no Chomei about 1155 1216 CE was a low level Japanese aristocrat during the late Heian Period and Early Kamakura Period Having experienced frustrations in terms of political advancement and having lived through a series of natural disasters, he became a Buddhist monk, a recluse, and an author His short work, Hojoki variously translated into English as An Account of My Hut or An Account of a Ten Foot Hut , has become a Japanese classic, an exposition of the Buddhist insight of impermanence.Most Japanese today easily recognize the work s opening paragraph Though the river s current never fails, the water passing, moment by moment, is never the same Where the current pools, bubbles form on the surface, bursting and disappearing as others rise to replace them, none lasting long In this world, people and their dwelling places are like that, always changing In the West, Heraclitus said much the same.Here are two other insights Because life is under heaven s control, it doesn t matter if I live long or not I am not concerned about early death, am like a floating cloud, and do not complain The happiness of my life can be expressed in one peaceful nap, and in the hope of seeing the beautiful scenery of the four seasons In general, the past, present, and future history of human beings is a product of the mind This short book, easily readable in an evening, is worth returning to again and again Its philosophy is clearly one of many that people have expounded over written history, and it can fruitfully be appreciated as one perspective that might be combined with others for the living of a fulfilling life This book is part of my beautiful 2018 MACHALO READING CHALLENGE AKA MMFBCE End of the World If you entrust yourself to the care of othersyou will be owned by them.If you care for othersyou will be enslavedby your own solicitude.If you conform to the worldit will bind you hand and foot.If you do not, thenit will think you mad.And so the question, where should we live And how Where to finda place to rest a while And how bringeven short lived peaceto our hearts Thanks to Capsguy for this For a text that is 800 years old it has major relevance to today A kind of Buddhist ode to downsizing and I can certainly relate I wish I could read Japanese, I m sure there are nuances in the language that translate evenpoetically. i love love love Mediocre About the only good part is the opening paragraph, and even that, I think it is cliched I m sure the symbolism of a river was popular in his time already Chomei is a lay monk, and I think his understanding of impermanence is shallow, only in his head Please don t judge Japanese classics by this book If you like reading essays, try Essays in Idleness The Tsurezuregusa of Kenko written by another lay monk or The Pillow Book written by a court lady If you want to know about the Mediocre About the only good part is the opening paragraph, and even that, I think it is cliched I m sure the symbolism of a river was popular in his time already Chomei is a lay monk, and I think his understanding of impermanence is shallow, only in his head Please don t judge Japanese classics by this book If you like reading essays, try Essays in Idleness The Tsurezuregusa of Kenko written by another lay monk or The Pillow Book written by a court lady If you want to know about the Japanese concept of mono no aware, read The Tale of Genji or The Tale of the Heike, two very different stories, and yet, both succeed Genji is about a courtier, and with all his power, money, and many, many lovers he still cannot escape life Heike is about a warrior clan the historical events took place just a little before Hojoki time primarily about a man who rose the ranks by his own achievements, and he, his clan, and all the mighty men of both sides of the conflict perish in time I usually don t rate review books that I cannot give 4 or 5 stars With books, as with people, there are issues of chemistry, and I don t think it s fair to put down something someone just because I don t get it With this book, I m excusing myself because this is already considered a classic, and I really don t want people to give up on Japanese literature because of this book I read all these books in the original Japanese, with footnotes I hope the English translations are good This is an amazing little gem, and its applicability for today is amazing If you can find this, please spare the twenty or so minutes it would take for reading this, it truly is something to help put you back into reality.

Hojoki: Visions of a Torn World PDF/EPUB ã Visions of
    EPUB is an ebook file format that uses the epub home in the forest and eliminating desire, poet and Buddhist priest Chomei believed he would be spared the anguish that had befallen the townspeople Yet at the end we find the author consumed with self doubt, questioning his own sanity and the integrity of his purpose His voice reaches out from the distant past and speaks directly to our hearts, surprisingly modern and intensely humanAuthor Biography Yasuhiko Moriguchi and David Jenkins are writers, teachers, and translators living in KyotoStone Bridge Press is a leading English language publisher of Japanese literature in translation Our ROCK SPRING COLLECTION OF JAPANESE LITERATURE features absorbing and important translations of classical and contemporary Japanese fiction and poetry We believe that literature is a window into culture and society, and an expression of what is most peculiarly, and universally, human. I ve read listened to this book by accident I started playing the audiobook for Narrow Road to the Interior And Other Writings but this short little gem came first I ve never heard of the author before but I am glad I stumbled across him Kamo no Ch mei is a medieval Japanese writer,poet and essayist who takes the Buddhist vows becoming a monkThe flowing river never stops and yet the water never stays the same Foam floats upon the pools, scattering, re forming, never lingering long SoI ve read listened to this book by accident I started playing the audiobook for Narrow Road to the Interior And Other Writings but this short little gem came first I ve never heard of the author before but I am glad I stumbled across him Kamo no Ch mei is a medieval Japanese writer,poet and essayist who takes the Buddhist vows becoming a monkThe flowing river never stops and yet the water never stays the same Foam floats upon the pools, scattering, re forming, never lingering long So it is with man and all his dwelling places here on earth The above is the first paragraph of the book and I was mesmerized by its beauty The author continues to discuss the impermanence of life Then, he presents a series of disasters that he witnessed, natural and man made The hopeless view of the world made him decide to retreat outside the capital and become a hermit The author describes in great detail the tiny hut he builds, his daily activities and the reasons he decided to go on this path in order to find peace of mind The audiobook was narrated by the actor Togo Igawa which enhanced the Japanese feel of the writing Unfortunately, the Narrow Road is narrated by a different person whose accent is way too thick to be able to understand everything Below the crimson skies shivers the last leaf,Sings the blue bird, songs of a lonely treeI wonder where, swallowed by the spring rain,Floats the leaf, to claim a spotted graveThe sounds from Hojoki deeply permeate,Heart of a one room hut, poetry and music rhymeNestled within an early bud, what do I see Glimpses of Lotus Sutra, one man s pilgrimage.Five deciding elements of nature persuading the humble origin of the supreme fruition of man conceptualising the ephemeral life, the sensibility of ma Below the crimson skies shivers the last leaf,Sings the blue bird, songs of a lonely treeI wonder where, swallowed by the spring rain,Floats the leaf, to claim a spotted graveThe sounds from Hojoki deeply permeate,Heart of a one room hut, poetry and music rhymeNestled within an early bud, what do I see Glimpses of Lotus Sutra, one man s pilgrimage.Five deciding elements of nature persuading the humble origin of the supreme fruition of man conceptualising the ephemeral life, the sensibility of man imparting the teachings of the universe from a ten foot square hut attuned to the immortality of a poet s soul All things are imperfect All things are incomplete The image of Amida dwelling among the sanctimonious mountains, the Law of Buddha shinning through the soft cerise lotus petals and the bloom of the lotus in the murky waters spiritualizing the beauty coaxed through the ugliness of stagnation defining the modest truth of the nature The inevitable cosmos emerging from nothingness, accepting the transient inhabitation weaved into a metaphysical web of turbulence, isolation, hazards and tranquillity, devolving towards the exquisiteness of human totality fading into the depth of nothingness Humanistic traditions expanding the sensory ambivalence of nature in the spirituality of the mind the inevitable extinction evocating the aesthetics of existence in tender solitude of nothingness in the core of simplicity Thewabi sabiof the universe, in its purest form A house and its masterare like the dew that gatherson the morning glory Which will be the first to pass Sometimes the dew falls awaywhile the flowers stay.More permanent than the emergence of birth is the oblivion of death and the fleeting journey in between is something called life the ultimate pioneering grace of music and poetry The inception of bloom and lush, the dew on flowers awaits the morning sun falling then into the decay of the dusk A wasted beauty it is not, the man who builds a house for warmth only to die out in the cold comprehending the transitory nature of man and his dwelling Of the four elements,water, fire, and windoften cause great damage.Earth does not so oftenbring catastrophe..Earth is forever metamorphosing into the permanence of deathly grave a respite for the victims of impermanence And, when fearsome earthquakes engulf the vanities of the world, nature becomes the supreme equalizer of mankind You can t control nature, simply learn from it, the greatest educator Sinful times That I should witnesssuch a dreadful thing Kamo no Chomei 1153 1216 was the second son of a Shinto priest in Kyoto One of the leading poets of the late Heian Period at the imperial court, Chomei s powerful intensity in the poetry and music engaged the phenomenon of nature with the intricacies of human life The notion of the universe destructing and constructing concurrently progresses the comprehensive system of nothingness embedded in the Chomei s poetic verses The elegance of Chomei s well crafted text mirrors the world he survived whilst recognising the legitimacy of nature and its association with man the fire destroyedsixteen noble houses who knows how manyI heard one thirdof the entire capital In this famed Japanese literary marvel deriving its titular inspiration from the tiny hermit hut built by Chomei himself during his pilgrimage in the mountainous towards the divinity of solitude spinning the , Kamo no Chomei scripts through various brush strokes the devastation of famine 1180 , the Kyoto fire 1175 CE , the great earthquake 1185 , deaths, floods, whirlwinds, political upheavals in the imperial court , yearning to banish materialistic hierarchy and in the end his pilgrimage to acquire a peaceful mind and the pristine beauty of simplicity nurtured in solitude In 1204, Chomei adhered to the teachings of Buddhism and lived a life of a recluse monk in the foothills of Mount Hino The path to enlightenment disentangles the dilemma of possessing an impure heart dwelling in the woods of discipline and retribution The enjoyment of simple company and by the means of mind and body as the only trustworthy entity for health and strength depicts the philosophy of Buddha and the wholesomeness of shunya zero Anold silkworm spinning its last cocoon , Chomei contemplates on the benevolent beauty of rural life endowed with materialistic emancipation and minimalism achieved through remoteness from the burdensome world On the road to achieving tranquillity, Chomei expresses Fish do not hate the water.But then, none can knowthe happiness of the fishunless he is one.A quiet life is much the same.How would anyone know itwithout living it The four metamorphosing seasons equating the four defining phases of human life, ceaselessly flow like the river reverberating vanity of time concealed beneath the watery whims of impermanence From the tenderness of glorious spring to the culmination of frosty snow, the poetic immortality of Kamo no Chomei defies the reluctant nature meditating through ethereal silence the transitory passage of man and the phenomenon of nature The flowing rivernever stopsand yet the waternever staysthe same Foam floatsupon the pools,scattering, re forming,never lingering long So it is with manand all his dwelling placeshere on earth. Calligraphy by Hon ami K etsu 1558 1637 , Underpainting attributed to Tawaraya S tatsu died ca 1640 , Poem by Kamo no Chomei ca 1154 1216 If we follow the ways of the world, things are hard for us if we refuse to follow them, we appear to have gone mad.As I understand it,Hojokiis read by every Japanese student in school and had a great influence on much that was subsequently written in Japanese It is one of the key texts of the Japanese culture Written by Kamo no Chomei in 1212 dCalligraphy by Hon ami K etsu 1558 1637 , Underpainting attributed to Tawaraya S tatsu died ca 1640 , Poem by Kamo no Chomei ca 1154 1216 If we follow the ways of the world, things are hard for us if we refuse to follow them, we appear to have gone mad.As I understand it,Hojokiis read by every Japanese student in school and had a great influence on much that was subsequently written in Japanese It is one of the key texts of the Japanese culture Written by Kamo no Chomei in 1212 during the collapse of the Heian dynasty, it is a poetically dense text, whether it is rendered in free verse, as is done in this book, or into prose, as is done by Donald Keene in his pioneeringAnthology of Japanese LiteratureAn earlier reviewer wrote However, it seems inadequate lacking in richness of human experience I beg to differ In a highly distilled poetic language Chomei describes the destruction of one third of Kyoto by a ravaging fire in 1177 with the concomitant horrible deaths then a monstrous tornado tore a swath 2 kilometers long through the city in 1180 Shortly thereafter the Emperor decided to move the capital, creating huge problems for the populace, totally uprooting their lives six months later the Emperor moved the capital back to Kyoto A two year long famine followed in 1181 1182, and Chomei evokes the terrible consequences and the altruistic acts of some of the inhabitants As if that weren t enough, a great earthquake leveled the city in 1185 These are indicated in brief, sharp strokes of the brush, not dwelt upon in gory detail as would be done now Chomei, who converted to Buddhism, supplements these clearly drawn illustrations of the precariousness of life and property with further examples of the problems of attachment to property, ambition, social status, loved ones, life After many disappointments and losses, Chomei withdraws from the world, builds and lives in a series of wooden huts in the countryside he lovingly describes his simple life there Some lines from this sectionThen in winter snow It settles just like human sin and melts, in atonement He plays music, writes, watches Nature, shares long walks with a 10 year old boy who occasionally visits, remembers friends and family, gathers from Nature the necessities to satisfy his very modest food and clothing needs But he is aware that he is now attached to his very simple life and reproaches himself for not being as mindful as some figures of Buddhist legend He is stuck in the quandary inherent in every absolute idealTo these questions of mind, there is no answer So now I use my impure tongue to offer a few prayers to Amida and then silenceAmida is the Buddha of comprehensive love OK,Hojokiis notWar and PeaceorA Tale of Two Citiesit is 15 pages long in Keene s prose version But I rather doubt that any 15 pages in those books are as dense in human experience asHojokiis Be that as it may, I find this to be a rich and moving text to which I often return My gratitude is due to the translators of this free verse version for providing another view of the text for those of us with no Japanese I have the feeling that I will re read thisoften than Keene s fine prose version Gentle prose The beginning reminds me of The Book of Ecclesiastes, warning the reader that all is vanity, one doesn t know what nature will do to your prized possessions. Kamo no Chomei about 1155 1216 CE was a low level Japanese aristocrat during the late Heian Period and Early Kamakura Period Having experienced frustrations in terms of political advancement and having lived through a series of natural disasters, he became a Buddhist monk, a recluse, and an author His short work, Hojoki variously translated into English as An Account of My Hut or An Account of a Ten Foot Hut , has become a Japanese classic, an exposition of the Buddhist insight of impermane Kamo no Chomei about 1155 1216 CE was a low level Japanese aristocrat during the late Heian Period and Early Kamakura Period Having experienced frustrations in terms of political advancement and having lived through a series of natural disasters, he became a Buddhist monk, a recluse, and an author His short work, Hojoki variously translated into English as An Account of My Hut or An Account of a Ten Foot Hut , has become a Japanese classic, an exposition of the Buddhist insight of impermanence.Most Japanese today easily recognize the work s opening paragraph Though the river s current never fails, the water passing, moment by moment, is never the same Where the current pools, bubbles form on the surface, bursting and disappearing as others rise to replace them, none lasting long In this world, people and their dwelling places are like that, always changing In the West, Heraclitus said much the same.Here are two other insights Because life is under heaven s control, it doesn t matter if I live long or not I am not concerned about early death, am like a floating cloud, and do not complain The happiness of my life can be expressed in one peaceful nap, and in the hope of seeing the beautiful scenery of the four seasons In general, the past, present, and future history of human beings is a product of the mind This short book, easily readable in an evening, is worth returning to again and again Its philosophy is clearly one of many that people have expounded over written history, and it can fruitfully be appreciated as one perspective that might be combined with others for the living of a fulfilling life This book is part of my beautiful 2018 MACHALO READING CHALLENGE AKA MMFBCE End of the World If you entrust yourself to the care of othersyou will be owned by them.If you care for othersyou will be enslavedby your own solicitude.If you conform to the worldit will bind you hand and foot.If you do not, thenit will think you mad.And so the question, where should we live And how Where to finda place to rest a while And how bringeven short lived peaceto our hearts Thanks to Capsguy for this For a text that is 800 years old it has major relevance to today A kind of Buddhist ode to downsizing and I can certainly relate I wish I could read Japanese, I m sure there are nuances in the language that translate evenpoetically. i love love love Mediocre About the only good part is the opening paragraph, and even that, I think it is cliched I m sure the symbolism of a river was popular in his time already Chomei is a lay monk, and I think his understanding of impermanence is shallow, only in his head Please don t judge Japanese classics by this book If you like reading essays, try Essays in Idleness The Tsurezuregusa of Kenko written by another lay monk or The Pillow Book written by a court lady If you want to know about the Mediocre About the only good part is the opening paragraph, and even that, I think it is cliched I m sure the symbolism of a river was popular in his time already Chomei is a lay monk, and I think his understanding of impermanence is shallow, only in his head Please don t judge Japanese classics by this book If you like reading essays, try Essays in Idleness The Tsurezuregusa of Kenko written by another lay monk or The Pillow Book written by a court lady If you want to know about the Japanese concept of mono no aware, read The Tale of Genji or The Tale of the Heike, two very different stories, and yet, both succeed Genji is about a courtier, and with all his power, money, and many, many lovers he still cannot escape life Heike is about a warrior clan the historical events took place just a little before Hojoki time primarily about a man who rose the ranks by his own achievements, and he, his clan, and all the mighty men of both sides of the conflict perish in time I usually don t rate review books that I cannot give 4 or 5 stars With books, as with people, there are issues of chemistry, and I don t think it s fair to put down something someone just because I don t get it With this book, I m excusing myself because this is already considered a classic, and I really don t want people to give up on Japanese literature because of this book I read all these books in the original Japanese, with footnotes I hope the English translations are good This is an amazing little gem, and its applicability for today is amazing If you can find this, please spare the twenty or so minutes it would take for reading this, it truly is something to help put you back into reality. 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  • Paperback
  • 96 pages
  • Hojoki: Visions of a Torn World
  • Kamo no Chōmei
  • English
  • 14 September 2017
  • 1880656221