Rachel Calof's Story: Jewish Homesteader on the Northern Plains

Rachel Calof's Story: Jewish Homesteader on the Northern PlainsCalof S Story Has The Electricity One Occasionally Finds In Primary Sources It Is Powerful, Shocking, And Primitive, With The Kind Of Appeal Primary Sources Often Attain Without Effort It Is A Strong Addition To The Literature Of Women S Experience On The Frontier Lillian Schlissel Asking For Approval To Use Quote In , Eighteen Year Old Rachel Bella Kahn Travelled From Russia To The United States For An Arranged Marriage To Abraham Calof, An Immigrant Homesteader In North Dakota Rachel Calof S Story Combines Her Memoir Of A Hard Pioneering Life On The Prairie With Scholarly Essays That Provide Historical And Cultural Background And Show Her Narrative To Be Both Unique And A Representative Western Tale Her Narrative Is Riveting And Candid, Laced With Humor And IronyThe Memoir, Written By Rachel Bella Calof In , Recounts Aspects Of Her Childhood And Teenage Years In A Jewish Community, Shtetl In Russia, But Focuses Largely On Her Life Between And , When She And Her Husband Carved Out A Life As Homesteaders She Recalls Her Horror At The Hardships Of Pioneer Life Especially The Crowding Of Many Family Members Into The X Dirt Floored Shanties That Were Their First Dewllings Of All The Privations I Knew As A Homesteader, Says Calof, The Lack Of Privacy Was The Hardest To Bear Money, Food, And Fuel Were Scarce, And During Bitter Winters, Three Calof Households Abraham And Rachel With Their Growing Children, Along With His Parents And A Brother S Family Would Pool Resources And Live Together With Livestock In One ShantyUnder Harsh And Primitive Conditions, Rachel Bella Calof Bore And Raised Nine Children The Family Withstood Many Dangers, Including Hailstorms That Hammered Wheat To The Ground And Flooded Their Home Droughts That Reduced Crops To Dust Blinding Snowstorms Of Plains Winters Through It All, However, Calof Drew On A Humor And Resolve That Is Everywhere Apparent In Her Narrative Always Striving To Improve Her Living Conditions, She Made Lamps From Dried Mud, Scraps Of Rag, And Butter Plastered The Cracked Wood Walls Of Her Home With Clay Supplemented Meagre Supplies With Prairie Forage Wild Mushrooms And Garlic For A Special Supper, Dry Grass For A Hot Fire To Bake Bread Never Sentimental, Caolf S Memoir Is A Vital Historical And Personal RecordJ Sanford Rikoon Elaborates On The History Of Jewish Settlement In The Rural Heartland And The Great Tide Of Immigration From The Russian Pale Of Settlement And Eastern Europe From Elizabeth Jameson Examines How Calof Writes From The Interior Spaces Of Private Life, And From That Vantage Point, Reconfigures Familiar Versions Of The American West Jameson Also Discusses How The Calofs Adapted Jewish Practices To The New Contingencies Of North Dakota, Maintaining Customs That Represented The Core Of Their Jewish Identity, Reconstructing Their Jewishness In New Circumstances This was a fascinating first person narrative of a Jewish homesteader who traveled from Russia to North Dakota for an arranged marriage in 1894 This is Rachel Bella Calof s story in her own words, and I read it in a day Little House on the Prairie this is not there is nothing romanticized here Calof writes in a clear, matter of fact voice of hardships I can t imagine living through year after year arriving to a roofless shack crowded with people she didn t yet know, being forced to share a This was a fascinating first person narrative of a Jewish homesteader who traveled from Russia to North Dakota for an arranged marriage in 1894 This is Rachel Bella Calof s story in her own words, and I read it in a day Little House on the Prairie this is not there is nothing romanticized here Calof writes in a clear, matter of fact voice of hardships I can t imagine living through year after year arriving to a roofless shack crowded with people she didn t yet know, being forced to share a bed wooden planks with chickens underneath, basically with her future mother in law, scraping together bits of dough to cook over a fire stoked with cow dung and grinding barley to substitute for coffee, and ultimately bearing nine children, most of them right there in the shack She was forced to figure just about everything out for herself, with virtually no support from her new family The severe isolation of the prairie coupled with the absolute lack of any privacy is unrelenting And then, of course, there are blizzards and hailstorms, difficult births, and conflicts with her mother in law.But it s never a depressing book I think it s a testament to Calof s strength and a story of what humans can endure I almost laughed when their entire crop was wiped out by a hailstorm and Calof seemed almost cheerful about it Like, well, we re all safe And we were so close this year Maybe next year we ll be successful It certainly puts things in perspective for me when I feel like complaining about, say, the fact that I haven t found time to paint my bathroom or whatever Or anything else.The epilogue written by Calof s youngest son and two afterwords expanding on the history and context of Calof s narrative were interesting as well My college roommate sent it to me with this note I never knew there was a prominent Jewish settlement near Devil s Lake I didn t either If you ever find yourself feeling sorry for yourself read this book If your kids are complaining about sharing a room, not having the hot clothes shoes electronics vacations etc make them read this book If you enjoy reading about American Jewish Women s settler s immigrant s history, read this book An amazing memoir of a woman who endures a horrible childhood in Russia only to move to the US, and then, becomes a homesteader on North Dakota Translated by her son, Rachel gives a riveting acc If you ever find yourself feeling sorry for yourself read this book If your kids are complaining about sharing a room, not having the hot clothes shoes electronics vacations etc make them read this book If you enjoy reading about American Jewish Women s settler s immigrant s history, read this book An amazing memoir of a woman who endures a horrible childhood in Russia only to move to the US, and then, becomes a homesteader on North Dakota Translated by her son, Rachel gives a riveting account of her first years in the frigid, remote setting She writes sparingly, but with great impact There is additional info and insight by her son and two professors to enhance her memoir The book is a short read that you will never forget 4 stars Such was the nature of our stark and simple life Little things made the difference between tragedy and happiness in a matter of minutes Our lives were uncomplicated Our purpose was survival, and through survival the hope that somehow the future would treat uskindly than had our past I read Rachel Calof s Story Jewish Homesteader on the Northern Plains for my Women in American History Since 1877 class, so I m not going to review I will just say that this is an excellent read 4 stars Such was the nature of our stark and simple life Little things made the difference between tragedy and happiness in a matter of minutes Our lives were uncomplicated Our purpose was survival, and through survival the hope that somehow the future would treat uskindly than had our past I read Rachel Calof s Story Jewish Homesteader on the Northern Plains for my Women in American History Since 1877 class, so I m not going to review I will just say that this is an excellent read especially if you re also Jewish and are interested in reading about other Jews and our past , and I m always happy to read books about Jewish women in history for class, and for fun, if I m being honest I loved this memoir by an early 1894 Jewish immigrant homesteader in North Dakota, both because of the personal detail of a fascinating life and also because of her occasional wry humor and sarcasm I m always amazed by early pioneer women who try to survive and thrive under horrendous conditions, and Rachel Calof revealsof herself than most I could only wish for , includingphotos 4.5 stars.P.S The essays after Rachel s story varied in interest to methat depends on your h I loved this memoir by an early 1894 Jewish immigrant homesteader in North Dakota, both because of the personal detail of a fascinating life and also because of her occasional wry humor and sarcasm I m always amazed by early pioneer women who try to survive and thrive under horrendous conditions, and Rachel Calof revealsof herself than most I could only wish for , includingphotos 4.5 stars.P.S The essays after Rachel s story varied in interest to methat depends on your historical interests A pretty amazing story and worth reading for anyone who is interested in the history of the Great Plains The history of the Great Plains is often glossed over people focus on indian fights, the gold rush, the Oregon Trail and that s about it This is a story of an immigrant settler in North Dakota and the hardships she has to endure There are some powerful images of her trudging through the snow for miles, while pregnant, to get to her nearest neighbor The book is a bit slow in places, but A pretty amazing story and worth reading for anyone who is interested in the history of the Great Plains The history of the Great Plains is often glossed over people focus on indian fights, the gold rush, the Oregon Trail and that s about it This is a story of an immigrant settler in North Dakota and the hardships she has to endure There are some powerful images of her trudging through the snow for miles, while pregnant, to get to her nearest neighbor The book is a bit slow in places, but that has mostly to do with the fact that the life of your average homesteader especially in the winters of North Dakota was very dull A quick and very interesting read If ever you feel inclined to whine about not having enough, just pick up this book How must it be to share a one room shack with a husband, your in laws, two dozen chickens and a calf And this without knowing whether your food and fuel supplies will last the winternot to mention not a cup of coffee to be had The best thing about the book is that Rachel never loses her hopes for the future she just keeps moving forward doing the best she can Well wort A quick and very interesting read If ever you feel inclined to whine about not having enough, just pick up this book How must it be to share a one room shack with a husband, your in laws, two dozen chickens and a calf And this without knowing whether your food and fuel supplies will last the winternot to mention not a cup of coffee to be had The best thing about the book is that Rachel never loses her hopes for the future she just keeps moving forward doing the best she can Well worth the couple of hours it takes to read Short but vivid description of the incredibly harsh life of North Dakota homesteaders the fact that the writer is Jewish is less important except in one bit about finding a kosher butcher as is the unimaginable poverty and discomfort of their lives The concept of owning land was incredibly attractive to these perpetually disenfranchised immigrants, but it turns out that there are easier and safer ways to make a living in America even then. This is a memoir written by the author about her life from her youth in Russia in the late 1800s to her life in North Dakota after coming to the U.S at age 18 to marry a man she didn t know He and his extended family were just beginning to homestead in North Dakota The hardships and the way they lived is mind boggling Her perseverance is amazing Highly recommend. This was amazing and not like anything else I ve read about homesteading on the prairies A really incredible account I so admire her Rachel Calof s StoryJewish Homesteader On The Northern PlainsCalof RikoonThere are four main parts to this book The first, and most important, is My Story by Rachel Bella Calof This is a first person narrative of Rachel s early life in Russia, her travel to the US as a mail order bride, and her life as a Jewish homesteader in northern North Dakota In the early years in ND, her life was bleak, filled with hard work, uncertainty, and questionable survival A fruitcake mother in law was a source Rachel Calof s StoryJewish Homesteader On The Northern PlainsCalof RikoonThere are four main parts to this book The first, and most important, is My Story by Rachel Bella Calof This is a first person narrative of Rachel s early life in Russia, her travel to the US as a mail order bride, and her life as a Jewish homesteader in northern North Dakota In the early years in ND, her life was bleak, filled with hard work, uncertainty, and questionable survival A fruitcake mother in law was a source of despair, uncertainty, and occasional assistance But the family did survive, and later become financially successful.During the reading of Rachel s story, another homesteader story played in background memory, namely, Land of the Burnt Thigh, by Edith Eudora Kohl Both stories paint a consistent picture of the trials, hardships, and desperation of early settlers, just one stroke of bad luck away from starvation and death.The second part of this book is an epilogue by Jacob Calof, one of Rachel s sons Jacob brings us up to date on the family in their later years.The third part of this book is Jewish Farm Settlements in America s Heartland by J Sanford Rikoon Mr Rikoon describes, in general terms, Jewish migration from Russia and Eastern Europe to the US mid west He also describes the subsequent moves from an initial homestead to asecure, sustainable life in or near towns and cities.The fourth part is Rachel Bella Calof s Life as Collective History by Elizabeth Jameson.This was a quick, very enjoyable read After reading this and Thigh , it is striking to realize some of the changes that have occurred, or not, re opportunity, security, grit, in the last 100 years

Reading ➾ Rachel Calof's Story: Jewish Homesteader on the Northern Plains Author Rachel Calof – Jobs-in-kingston.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 176 pages
  • Rachel Calof's Story: Jewish Homesteader on the Northern Plains
  • Rachel Calof
  • English
  • 01 April 2019
  • 0253209862